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Eye care

My sister 45 years old has  myopia (-6 dp) growing continuously  and is using corrective glasses since 10 years old. Lately asking the doctor if (with the aging) ,hypermetropia could correct her myopia he stated  that this type of myopia will continue to advance. My question is what kind of myopia is this and does exist any medicine which shall prevent the further advance. I'm really upset for the future of vision of my sister.
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2078052 tn?1331933100
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
It is unusual to see myopia worsening at your sister's age, but reasons could include diabetes with uncontrolled glucose, onset of nuclear cataracts, and degenerative myopia with progressive axial growth of the eye and retinal degeneration.  Your sister should see an ophthalmologist for a complete exam, including dilation.  She may also need to see a retinal specialist.  
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Avatar universal
Thank you for your advice. She went to ophthalmologist and retinal specialist. He said her retina is very thin and dystrophyc. The only recommendation for the moment it was the retina nutrition with vitamin tablets such blueberry and avoiding the weight and hot shower. The advancing of the myopia shall be seen only on the next visit after several months or one year. Does exist any other option for feeding the dystrophyc retina? thank you to a comment.
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