Aa
A
A
A
Close
Eye Care Forum
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Avatar universal

Lesion near optic nerve?

I went to an optometrist for a routine eye exam, and she discovered something that looks like a black spot (lesion) near my right optic nerve. She ran an automated visual field test and found that my right eye shows evidence of a bitemporal defect in my visual field. This surprises me because I never noticed any problems with my field of vision. She didn't say anything about my intraocular pressure, so I assume it was normal. Any idea what this thing could be? I'll be seeing a neuro-opthalmologist in the next few days.

Here are the photos she took:
http://i1358.photobucket.com/albums/q780/vortexpanel/myeyes_zpsf91e4b6d.jpg
2 Responses
2078052 tn?1331936700
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
The black spot could be benign pigment near the nerve, or a choroidal nevus which is a freckle under the retina.  A bitemporal defect, by definition, is a loss of the outer (temporal) field of vision in BOTH eyes, and usually points to a problem in the pituitary gland.  I completely agree, you should see a neuro-ophthalmologist.
Avatar universal
Thanks, and sorry for the confusion. The optometrist did in fact find a temporal defect in BOTH eyes (bitemporal defect) with a Humphrey FDT.

I saw a general opthalmologist yesterday who gave me a thorough eye exam and said my eyes were completely healthy. He performed some basic visual field tests and found nothing abnormal, but didn't do the Humphrey FDT because my eyes were already dilated. He wants to redo the Humphrey test next week and see if the results can be duplicated.

I'm a little confused about the Humphrey results. Is it possible to have a large bitemporal defect in the Humphrey without corresponding blindness/loss of vision? Neither the optometrist nor the opthalmologist could detect any actual blindness. Is it possible the FDT was simply performed incorrectly?
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Find out how beta-blocker eye drops show promising results for acute migraine relief.
Eye whitening, iris color change, and eyeball "bling." Eye expert Dr. John Hagan warns of the dangers from these unnecessary surgeries.
Eye expert John Hagan, MD, FACS, FAAO discusses factors to consider and discuss with your eye care team before embarking on cataract surgery.
Is treating glaucoma with marijuana all hype, or can hemp actually help?
Protect against the leading cause of blindness in older adults
Got dry eyes? Eye drops aren't the only option! Ophthalmologist John C. Hagan III, MD explains other possible treatments.