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REVERSING My Myopia 9.5 really need help - cannot carry on this way

Hello
I am trying to reverse my myopia, I believe that this is possible.
I have come across several articles on how to exercise your eye, for 4 hours every day, taking a break every 15 minutes
you can push another inch away etc.So I will be doing this for the next Year, and I will be posting my feedback on this website with feedback on how I have done.
Kindest regards
LC
10 Responses
Avatar universal
See http://www.allaboutvision.com/buysmart/see_clearly.htm
11548417 tn?1506084164
There are different causes for myopia.
If the lens is too curved, for instance from too much reading at short distance, relaxing it by exercises might help.
If however the myopia is caused by the eyeball being too long, the exercises may not have much effect.
Avatar universal
re: "I believe that this is possible"

Unfortunately the wish to believe something doesn't magically make it a reality.  Given that there is a large % of the public who are myopic there are many people searching for answers and it seems unlikely that something simple like that would have been missed by the myriad doctors and researchers searching for a way to improve vision, including often to improve their own. As this MD explains:

http://www.geteyesmart.org/eyesmart/ask/questions/exercise-refractive-errors.cfm
"Wouldn't that be great! Unfortunately, problems like nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism cannot be corrected with eye exercises."

and:

http://www.webmd.com/eye-health/features/natural-vision-correction-does-it-work?page=2
"Yet, the American Optometric Association and American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) say there is no scientific evidence that such methods work.

In 2004, the AAO studied whether natural vision care could improve sight. The techniques included eye exercises, massage, muscle relaxation, and nutritional supplements.

Some patients said the techniques helped their nearsightedness (myopia). But when researchers tested the patients' vision, it had not changed. The AAO concluded that patients who reported improved vision may have experienced the "placebo effect:" If you think something will work, you think you see better even if vision has not changed."

There are some recent claims that using a Gabor patch led to some visual improvements due to merely people being able to resolve a blurry image a bit better with practice, but there are reasons to be skeptical of a poor quality study that hasn't been replicated:

http://www.cogsci.nl/blog/miscellaneous/226-can-you-brain-train-your-way-to-perfect-eyesight
"To sum up, it is not entirely impossible that perceptual learning could lead to real-life vision improvements. But so far there is little evidence to suggest that it does, and the claims made by Deveau and colleagues are therefore very bold. And bold claims need to be backed by solid evidence. ....

So what are we left with? With the interesting hypothesis that perceptual learning leads to real-life improvements in vision. But this hypothesis is only very weakly supported by a methodologically weak study. And with a massive conflict of interest to boot, because the senior author is commercially exploiting the training program.

But what annoys me most is that this paper gives hope, quite possibly false, to the many people who suffer from vision impairments. And it tricks these people into paying for an app, which is quite possible worthless."

Even if it did wind up working, at most it improved vision only a line or two on the eye chart (which would leave someone 9.5D myopic still highly myopic so it isn't clear that even if it worked its worth the trouble). As even one of the less skeptical articles on what appears to be a poor quality study put it:

http://www.livescience.com/50835-brain-training-improves-vision.html
"And although the training would likely work for anyone, people who, can't find their glasses in the morning if they don't already have them on their face, are unlikely to see much use for it. That's because the training doesn't improve the eye's optics, which are largely the cause of nearsightedness and farsightedness, Deveau said.

'We can expect a one- to two-line difference on an eye chart, so that depends on where you start,' Deveau told Live Science.  "

This is a blog entry on another bogus method claimed to use exercises to improve eyesight:

http://eyesurgerysingapore.blogspot.com/search/label/Bates%20method
Avatar universal
I too am a Software Developer! That's the issue!
Today, I was building in VB.NET and realized I had to take 5 minute breaks every 10 minutes, it worked, no blurry vision as my eyes did not get tired...the muscle was not constantly strained.
I will continue to search, I believe that the eye has elongated because I am not using enough movement to keep the eye formation round in shape... naiive, but, that is what i have to go with.
I will order weaker and weaker lenses, to try and aid my eyesight in regaining, each month...hopefully i can walk around the house without lenses by the end of this year.
Avatar universal
For -9.5D of myopia, you will have very long eyeballs. This is caused by actual growth of tissue, and you have a larger eye than other people with no myopia.

You cannot control your eyeball shape or length by moving it more or less, or by relaxing it, or by wearing lesser powered glasses, or by not wearing glasses. It is just not physically or biologically possible or plausible.

Now, can you walk around the house without lenses/spectacles? Yes, you can. You can do that even now, because even with -9.5D of myopia, especially with reasonable light, most objects are visible, like the furniture, the walls, etc. But is your vision clear, or will it be clear after trying weaker lenses? No, it will not be. You still won't be able to see detail in the distance like the time on a clock across the room.

So, you could continue trying it, but I and others will tell you that it does not work. And unfortunately there are many misleading articles and websites out there that are trying to convince people otherwise.
Avatar universal
How does one change the shape of a ball shaped object that is longer, to a shorter  length eyeball? surely that must be the solution.
as for ordinary solutions, well, I'm unsatisfied, there must be something out there on academia.edu, or rather an attempt that's in trial, or perhaps some new laser surgery.
This just cannot go on.
Avatar universal
Some parts of our body, like our arms, fingers, legs and so on, grow to a certain length, and then stop once we mature. When we get very old, yes, we may end up slightly shorter, but generally speaking there is no simple treatment that can make our body parts smaller once they get to a certain size. Some form of surgery might be possible, but for the eye, any shortening procedure like a macular buckle is fraught with complications and is technically very difficult.

Medicine has its limits. We continue to progress, and revolutions in treating various conditions are bound to happen in the future, but current 'ordinary' solutions (glasses/contact lenses/refractive surgery) are the best we have at the moment.
Avatar universal
re: "or perhaps some new laser surgery. "

There are new and improved laser surgery techniques to correct myopia being  invented all the time. It isn't clear what objection you have to the current techniques, other than that they aren't yet perfect and involve some risks.

There are people working on orthokeratology (sometimes called ortho-k) which aims to reshape the eye in a way that parallels the way orthodontics reshapes teeth with braces. The results however are only temporary in adults. Ortho-k is done   by wearing a rigid contact lens while you sleep which reshapes the cornea to correct your vision so it is good while you are awake. The cornea gradually returns to its old shape though so you need to keep using the treatment regularly, unlike with teeth where the effect is longer lasting once the slow shift in position has been achieved.

The last I checked in some places they could treat 9.5D of myopia *sometimes* with ortho-k, but not always, it depends on other characteristics of the eye, and that is pushing the limit of what they can do so I don't know if it fully corrects it. I think in most places they don't yet treat myopia that high however. For older adults with presbyopia, some ortho-k doctors are even using multifocal or extended depth of focus patterns.

I haven't looked into the risks and benefits of ortho-k since I was fine with just using regular contact lenses up until my cataract surgery which corrected my myopia.  Cataract surgery replaces the natural lens with an artificial lens, but most people don't consider it replacing the natural lens as an elective  option to ever consider for someone young since it gets rid of their large level of accommodation (ability to adjust the eye to see close up when corrected for good distance vision). Eventually there will be artificial lenses that are even better than the natural lens and replacement surgery may make sense for any age, but that is many years in the future.  Even for older adults with presbyopia who have lost their accommodation it is questionable whether the risk is worth the benefits at the moment to do lens replacement surgery unless they have a cataract and need to do so to get clear vision.
Avatar universal
I'm confident that you can do it!

check out these websites:

http://skinverse.com/the-ocular-diaries-how-i-improved-my-vision-naturally-by-using-progressively-weaker-glasses-part-1/

http://gettingstronger.org/2014/08/myopia-a-modern-yet-reversible-disease/

http://www.powerfulintentions.org/forum/topics/success-story-how-to-effectively-reverse-nearsightedness

get weaker lens prescriptions for your myopia, and start 'active focusing' which is basically actively trying to focus on objects that are blurry.
never use full prescription lens when reading something close up either - that is what causes myopia progression in the first place
Avatar universal
There is a difference between what causes myopic progression in the first place (which is still being researched), and what might change it afterwards. Lets say that a better diet in modern countries led people to be taller than prior generations and you wound up being 6 feet tall at age 18. If you decided you preferred being closer to average for some reason, merely eating a poor diet over the next 18 years wouldn't likely make you shorter (I suspect such an effect would have been noticed since not all adults have good diets, but some of them had better diets when their parents fed them).

You can find extraordinary claims for almost anything around the internet. People who have seen Elvis Presley alive, been kidnapped and taken to other planets and returned. There are even emails people get promising lots of money for helping say a Nigerian person get their money out of Africa. The existence of those claims  doesn't mean all these claims match reality no matter how much you might wish to believe them.

There is a reason that the scientific method evolved long ago as a better attempt at trying to understand how the world really works than merely anecdotal observations and unscientific leaps based on little data.

There are many reasons people's eyesight can change over time. For all you know there may be thousands of people trying eye exercises and not seeing an impact, but then if one person happens to see their vision improve for some reason unrelated to he exercises, but they happened to be doing eye exercises at the time, they might wish to believe it was the exercises. So even if it were the case that someone's post was accurate and their  eyesight did change while they were engaged in eye exercises, that may be because for instance they developed cataracts that shifted their prescription, or some other oddity unrelated to the exercises occurred. That is the reason why people do scientific studies, to try to isolate what works and what doesn't vs. wishful thinking and flawed attribution of the cause of a change.

There are many people who would love to discover a breakthrough in treating myopia and would love to do a scientific study to prove that there is an easy method to do so.

Obviously you are free to waste your time on eye exercises that are unlikely to work. However if you really think it works, it would be useful to actually try to prove it to the world in a scientific fashion to benefit others. Find some doctor or researcher willing to do an actual trial of a number of people doing eye exercises to document the results.  I suspect it will merely demonstrate that the exercises do no good, but if you insist on spending lots of time on them, at least it'll provide an added more useful bit of evidence for the rest of the world to learn from.
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