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Reoccuring red in eye, Episcleritis?!

Hello, I have a red spot in my eye that has been reoccuring for almost 8 years. It is inflamed and will calm down within minutes. I think it may be due to allergies? Any thoughts on what this could be? I have visited an optometrist and she prescribed steroid drops for 10 days. Problem became almost non existent until i stopped using them. It's a little pink and when inflamed it can become more red. I can post pics if needed.
4 Responses
1731421 tn?1358823371
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
This could be an inflammed pinguecula, too. Main thing is to ensure size of red spot (when calm and clear) is not growing. You can also develop small cancers on the surface of the eye (alarming) and you should raise this question to your ophthalomogist.

Sincerely,
Timothy D. McGarity, M.D.
Avatar universal
Its not changing in size as fat as getting bigger. When the inflation subsides it looks very light pink. My eyes have been very dry (both of them) due to what I think is allergies. If you think a picture can help I would like to email you one. I have a side by side shot of both inflamed and not. Please let me know. Thank you.
Avatar universal
I apologize for all the spelling errors haha ^^^^
1731421 tn?1358823371
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
No problem. This forum is to help give you guidance. A specific diagnosis can not be provided. This should be done in person with your ophthalmologist.

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