Aa
A
A
A
Close
Eye Care Community
21.9k Members
Avatar universal

What type of sedation is used for cataract surgery?

I read Dr. Hagan's article a few years ago along with some posts that followed.....The surgery center I'm thinking of using for mine wasn't helpful with information on this.  (I haven't had the consult yet) ...One office said they use Versed in their 'twilight sedation,' but that the patient can follow directions with that.  I'm wondering if one can receive some sort of IV relaxing sedation without the use of Versed?  Is there a sedation most eye surgeons prefer to use for cataract surgery?  Patients I've talked to so far say "I have no idea!" what they got.  I'd like to feel as 'with it' as possible afterwards, not 'loopy' or 'groggy'.  Thanks
2 Responses
177275 tn?1511758844
Versed is common and very useful.  Most patients have 'injection" anesthesia "Peribulbar"  a bolus of something like versed is used and the patient goes to sleep for 3-4 minutes. During this time the anesthetist or anesthesiologist or ophthalmologist does the injection so that patient doesn't feel the needle. When the person wakes up they are relaxed during the procedure which often takes less than 15 minutes but can still comply with directions.
9 Comments
Thank you very much.  You are so quick to respond, Dr. Hagan.  When you say 'injection anesthesia' then you mean they get the eye numbed thru the needle injection plus the oral Versed?   I happened to look up a few things online too and it said some dr's use topical anesthesia to perform cataract surgery, and some use the injection (needle) anesthesia, so when I consult with a dr I will ask which one is used.  
Both of mine I had an IV at the hospital.  They wheeled me into the OR.  Injected something (don't know what it was).  I was out.  I do remember seeing the dr. working and some light show going on, but just didn't care.  Afterwards I woke up feeling refreshed and went home and took a couple hour nap.   It really wasn't bad at all.  Good Luck, Jim
Yes an anesthetic with a spreading agent is injected through a needle placed through the lid. Topical anesthesia uses drops applied to the eye to numb it and when the eye is incised a cannula injects anesthesia into the eye.  Most people prefer injection anesthesia. My wife had that for her two eye surgeries.  The disadvantages of topical anesthesia:  more feeling hence for some it is painful, the eye moves which makes it more difficult for the surgeon (injection keeps the eye from moving called akinesia), the patient sees what is going on and the light is very bright.
Several studies done where a person had injection anesthesia one eye and topical the other.  The studies showed people preferred the injection. In our large practice probably 90%+ are injection.  Topical often reserved for people on blood thinners, very long eyes (highly mypopic), a history of bleeding with injection on the first eye.
Thank you, Jim.  Thank you for the detailed explanations, Dr. Hagan.  I appreciate it.  When I got to the end of it however I thought oh.... I am indeed  one of those highly myopic people.... I'm not on blood thinners or anything at all, though.  I'll see what they say.   Thanks again .... it's good to stop and think about this and ask the doctor what is best for me.  This kind of information helps me to know what to ask.  I had read a bit about the differences - as you say, yes, with injection the eye muscles don't move, and with topical they can, though hopefully one wouldn't be moving one's eye anyway!  I'm glad I have some time to think about these things.
Good luck. Topical is not for nervous, low pain threshold people
I am highly myopic (-10 and -12).  I had an injection for a vitrectomy to repair a macular hole plus cataract surgery on my right eye.  A a few months later I had a topical for cataract surgery on the left eye.   No complications with either. I experienced some manageable pain with both, and surprising to me, the pain was connected to the cataract part, not the more invasive vitrectomy and macular repair.
I am highly myopic (-10 and -12).  I had an injection for a vitrectomy to repair a macular hole plus cataract surgery on my right eye.  A a few months later I had a topical for cataract surgery on the left eye.   No complications with either. I experienced some manageable pain with both, and surprising to me, the pain was connected to the cataract part, not the more invasive vitrectomy and macular repair.
Thanks for your comments and hope your surgery turned out well. The vitreous doesn't have pain fibers. The front of the eye is richly innervated with nerves that can cause pain.
Avatar universal
I recall feeling no pain during the procedure, only some pressure against the eye. Was also aware of the cataract being removed as I could “see” it diminish in size. One time the surgeon had to admonish me to not move my eye. Whole procedure took no more than 15 minutes.
1 Comments
Different strokes for different folks.
Have an Answer?
Top General Health Answerers
177275 tn?1511758844
Kansas City, MO
Avatar universal
Grand Prairie, TX
Avatar universal
San Diego, CA
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
In this unique and fascinating report from Missouri Medicine, world-renowned expert Dr. Raymond Moody examines what really happens when we almost die.
Think a loved one may be experiencing hearing loss? Here are five warning signs to watch for.
When it comes to your health, timing is everything
We’ve got a crash course on metabolism basics.
Learn what you can do to avoid ski injury and other common winter sports injury.
Here are the pros and cons of the top fad diets and weight loss plans of the year.