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Avatar universal

optic glioma treatment

My 2 year old nephew had been going through chemo for the last 6 months for Optic Gliomas on both optic nerves.  He just had an MRI that showed the tumors were still growing so they would have to remove both via surgery and they would not be able to save his vision. I am having a hard time believing there are no other options. Should they get a second opinion or is this truly the only other option for treating these tumors?
2 Responses
1573381 tn?1296151159
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Gliomas on both nerves is unfortunate and uncommon.  Does he have neurofibromatosis?  If they are talking about radical surgery that will take what's left of his vision, it doesn't hurt to get a second opinion from a well respected academic center.  Unfortunately though, these kind of tumors wrap around the optic nerve and are virtually impossible to remove without sacrificing the nerve.  Most grow slowly though and are not removed unless threatening other vital structures.  He may have a more agressive form if they think removal is necessary.  

HV
Avatar universal
Thanks for your response.  They are getting a second opinion. He does have Neurofibromatosis.  I have learned they are afraid of the tumors affecting his Pituitary Gland (I think).
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