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weird flash in the corner of my eye

i have been lightheaded with sinuses pressure and back of head pressure and back of head headaches with eyes pressure for 4 months straight 24/7

every time i like to the right then look the the left i see a with flash the corner of my left eye or sometimes it looks like little wiggly line

i saw a Ophthalmologist 1 month ago and he said everything looked fine i also had a mri of the head witch was normal im going to see a Optometrist soon would could be causing this is it vertical heterophoria?
2 Responses
2078052 tn?1331933100
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Vertical heterophoria would not give you light flashes.  Light flashes usually result from the vitreous pulling on the retina as the vitreous goes through its natural process of separating from the retina.  Most of the time, this process causes no damage, but in 10% of cases, a retinal tear can result.  Your ophthalmologist needs to perform a gonioscopy to be sure that the anterior chamber angles are open and not narrow; very narrow angles could cause a narrow or angle closure glaucoma attack with eye pain and pressure.  After that you need a dilated retinal exam with scleral depression by an ophthalmologist, perhaps a retinal specialist to be sure that there is no retinal tear.
Avatar universal
A related discussion, blobs of moving flashlight when i move my eyes was started.

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