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Avatar universal

No ovaries, successful IVF - can I breastfeed?

Both of my ovaries were removed for cancer years ago, and I recently underwent IVF successfully with donor eggs and injectible hormones.  I'm currently 8 months pregnant and would really like to breastfeed for as long as possible.  I imagine after I deliver (and lose my hormone-producting placenta), I will go through menopause again - will this affect milk production?  Do I have to take supplemental hormones to maintain lactation?  Any stories out there of women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy, then IVF and were successful with breastfeeding?
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Avatar universal
Yes! I had my ovaries removed due to cancer 3 years ago, I'm now 4 months pregnant using a donor egg.  If your seriously looking at this I would recommend a Spanish clinic they are much better than English ones and considerably cheaper..
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Avatar universal
Hello, My ovaries were also removed when I was 21 I have a child that is a teen and I am 33 now and want to have another child. So my question is beingthat I dont have my own eggs can I get a donor egg and possibly still be able to carry? I do have my uterus.
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Avatar universal
hi, iave been trying to have a baby for the past two years but, cannot. i found out that i have small ovaries. i have tried stimulant drug gonal-f but,my follicles were not being produce enough or growing so, we had to stop the process. does any have similar situation or know of anyone who was successfull ingetting prenant please e-mail me at hotbody_now***@****  thank you
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270419 tn?1201241576
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Dear mtz19-

I have had premature ovarian failure patients who have successfully breastfed. The main hormone driving milk let-down is prolacting, which is released by the pituitary gland as a reflex to suckling. A couple of patients have had low volume of breast milk, and we have been able to improve this using a medicine called metoclopramide if required. Estrogen levels even in women without ovarian failure are actually quite low immediately post-partum. I hope things work out!
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Avatar universal
I know that postmenopausal women are able to breastfeed.  My understanding of breastfeeding is that it happens as a result of nipple stimulation, and although the hormones secreted from the placenta are the easiest ways to kickstart it, adoptive mothers and even the occasional man have been able to stimulate their nipples into producing milk without hormones.  I don't think your oophorectomy should keep you from breastfeeding unless you are on hormone therapy that would endanger your child and your mammary glands have not been damaged.
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