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635774 tn?1222751413

Transvaginal ultrasound results

Hi
My husband and i are currently investigating infertility. I had a transvaginal ultrasound and need some help to understand the doctors report about my results.

I am desperate for someone to explain it to me as i dont have an appointment with my gyno for another 4 weeks!! Please someone help me understand??

The report reads as follows:
REPORT: The uterus is normal in size and echopattern measuring 74 x 47 x 37mm.

The endometrium is 7mm in thickness and exhibits a secretory pattern.

The ovaries are normal in size although they exhibit an underlying mild polycystic pattern with and increase in peripheral follicles and ovarian stroma. There is however evidence of a collapsed follicle in the right ovary.

The adnexal regions appear normal with no evidence of any tubal thickening or dialation. No free fluid is identified.

I really would like to know if this means that i show signs of polycystic ovarian syndrome and what 'peripheral follicles', 'ovarian stroma' and 'collapsed follicle' means.

Any help and information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Leilani


5 Responses
342988 tn?1299782356
did you ask the doctor?  call him but it seems like he could be stating that PCOS is a possiblity.  which really is not a bad thing.  simple medications will help you ovulate.  does he have you set up for the test to see if you ovulate and release an egg?  i think it is just simple blood work.

also why did he do an ultrasound instead of an HSG?
308584 tn?1228850632
Also-the collapsed follicle sounds like a good thing-they develop on the ovary to develop an egg and release it, and then if no pregnancy results they collapse.
I agree though-call the doctor! If they are trying to help figure this out, they should be willing to see you more often, or at least talk to you and come up with a plan-waiting four weeks wouldn't be acceptable to me, that's a whole cycle! Just my opinion though.
229439 tn?1245812437
All this means is that you have a cluster of cysts that are looking like polycystic ovarian syndrome. Ovarian cyst can be normal. The only time they consider it a syndrome is when you are having complications do to the cysts like insulin resistance, irregular or absent periods, annovulatory cycles, etc. If you Doc was concerned I'm sure he would have talked to you about it. But if your worried don't hesitate to call you doctor and have then explain your results.
178239 tn?1277405491
The stroma is the soft connective tissue that covers the ovary. The peripheral follicles are what is leading them to suspect mild PCOS. In PCOS the follicles tend to grow along the periphery of the ovary. Usually, 12 or more is a good indication of PCOS. The vast majority of women with PCOS have difficulty ovulating on their own or do not. The collapsed follicle is indicitive of ovulation, which is a very good sign. The fact that "mild" is used is also good. It may sound scary, but you are on the right path. I have had "unexplained infertility" for more than 20yrs. It is nice to know you have a good outlook for treatment. Especially with mild PCOS. Often, Metformin alone will keep it under control. Good luck to you!   :)  Did your dr make an appt to discuss the results and the course of treatment?
Avatar universal
It sounds like good results.  And it sounds like you definitely ovulate, hence the collapsed follicle.
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