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Fibromyalgia Community
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Avatar universal

Is this Fibromyalgia?

For the last few months I have had near constant tingling in my shoulders, my forearms hurt and some leg weakness  When I workout or go to the driving range the day after my arms feel very fatigued and I feel a bit out of it.  I am unable to sleep either because I am worrying about this or this is part of the disease process.  More to the story, I recently tested positive for hsv1 and hsv2. I was only tested because I was dating someone that was hsv2 positive.  I don't recall any type of an outbreak.  My doctor has had me on acyclovir for the last 4 months as suppressive therapy.  I am still waiting for the results of a brain MRI and spine xrays.  All my arthritis blood work has been negative along with HIV, syphillis, lymes etc.  
Everything I read about fibro is people experience a lot of pain.  I really don't have any pain.  It's more of a tingling weaknesses in my shoulders and in my thighs. I also have a bit of a nagging dull ache in my right groin area.  The nights I do sleep well, which is rare, the next day I feel great.  I am a male in my 40's and very concerned.
10 Responses
4851940 tn?1515694593
Blood work for arthritis is to find out what your inflammation markers are.  This is usually to test for inflammatory autoimmune arthritic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis.

It does not mean that you do not have any other type of arthritis.  The most common one is osteoarthritis.  

The symptoms that you are experiencing in your shoulders and arms, may be due to changes in the rotator cuff itself, or referred problems from the bones in your neck (cervical area).

The tingling in your thighs and especially if this is on the outer thighs, and especially with you having a dull ache in your groin area, could be caused by a condition called meralgia paraesthetica.  The nerve of the thigh is called the lateral cutaneous nerve it is also known as the lateral femoral nerve.  Meralgia paresthetica happens when the nerve is trapped or impinged.  If you overweight, losing weight will help to relieve the pressure.

Ask your doctor to refer you to gave an xray done of your neck and shoulders and an ultrasound scan of your ratotor cuffs.  
These imaging tests will show any bone degeneration that may be impinging on nerves causing the sensations of pins and needles and any damage in the rotator cuff that may have damage, impingement, inflammation of the subacromial bursa or other problem.

Also ask your doctor to refer you to physiotherapy.  Do not do anything can aggravates your condition.

A nagging pain in the right groin could be caused by a number of things and you should mention this to your doctor to find out the cause.

My interpretation of Fibromyalgia is that this diagnosis if given when there is no underlying bone or soft tissue damage.

Before you do any workouts, make sure that you do warm up exercises.  This is to avoid damage to muscles and tendons.

Make an appointment to see your doctor to get the appropriate imaging tests done and a referral to the physiotherapist.

Let me know how you get on.
4851940 tn?1515694593
Here is a web link about fibromyalgia that you may find of interest.

http://www.ukfibromyalgia.com/what-is-fm.html
Avatar universal
Hi Jemma116,

I appreciate your response.  The weird thing is, these symptoms come and go.  Yesterday I had no tingling or forearm pain.  I felt great.  Now today, I have had intense tingling in both shoulders and arms along with the forearm pain.  It's driving me crazy.  I am waiting to see the results of my brain MRI and my spine x-rays.  My primary did mention something about spinal stenosis on my xrays, but she said that was fairly normal for people my age and asked me to wait to speak to the neuro about these results.  I'm pretty sure I've been worked up for all types of arthritis and all blood tests were negative.  Maybe this is a side effect of the acyclovir?  I'm really putting my hands in these Dr's expertise, unfortunately, the Dr.s in Las Vegas have not impressed me.
4851940 tn?1515694593
As with any disorder, it will depend on what you do and how things get aggravated to flare up the symptoms.

I have in the past experienced tingling that ran from the shoulder and down the arm - that was impingement in the cervical area.

The sensations may also come from the rotator cuff - it will depend on what you do with your arms as to how they get aggravated.  I have a full tare and other problems in the rotator cuff, but the symptoms are not consistent and not the same throughout the day.  There is more discomfort and pain that can run down the arm during sleep.  

Spinal stenosis means narrowing and because of this, nerves can be impinged and aggravated, depending on which nerve is being aggravated, this will cause tingling, pain radiating down the arm as well as weakness (upper back).  Spinal stenosis can cause problems in the legs and feet.

As we are all different and our perception of pain is different. what may be a mild form of stenosis for you, does not mean that you have less discomfort.  

Glad that your doctor is trying to find the cause.  Unfortunately, they are only human and do not have x-ray vision and it also depends on what area of medicine they specialise in.  I have been misdiagnosed a couple of times in my lifetime.

When you see your doctor next, suggest rotator cuff problems should your other results come back fine.  It still may be worth getting them scanned, especially if you have done heavy lifting, had a fall onto your shoulders, do any repetitive work, have played football or rugby or any other sport that uses over arm movements.

With regard to side effects of the acyclovir  (an antiviral drug that is used to slow down the spread of herpes), you will need to discuss that with your doctor.

You can read the information regarding this medication and side effects on
http://www.drugs.com/acyclovir.html

Let me know how you get on.
Avatar universal
I will.  I appreciate your help.
Avatar universal
I forgot to mention, my upper body tingling and weakness seems to be exacerbated when I do something as simple as ride the stationary bike the night or day before.  That's what is so crazy about this.  A month ago it was excacerbated by things like lifting weights or hitting golf balls.  Now it is something as simple as riding a stationary bike.  That's why i think this might be some type of fatigue syndrome like fibromyalgia.
4851940 tn?1515694593
When you are doing the physical things, it changes your posture and it makes sense that nerves will be aggravated causing tingling.

Any type of persistent chronic pain or tingling will make you feel fatigued.
Avatar universal
Have you ever heard of Transverse Myelitis?  I have heard the herpes simplex virus can cause this.  This is a concern for me because I have many of these symptoms.
4851940 tn?1515694593
Yes, I have heard of Transverse Myelitis, although I am not familiar with it, I do know that it is a neurological disorder that causes inflammation of the spinal chord.
No doubt you will find information with regard to that on the web.

I would have thought that if you did have this illness, you would be feeling very unwell, may be even with a fever and your pins and needle sensations would not be coming and going.  

I would suggest that you stop worrying about what you may or may not have.  This will make you anxious and make you more stressed due to worry.

Wait until you get the results of your MRI scan and xray and you can then discuss the results with your doctor.
Avatar universal
I agree.  I will try to calm down and wait for my results.  I did call the Mayo Clinic in Phoenix.  That is always an option for me too.
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