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Food Addiction / Sugar Addiction Forum
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I have to eat every couple hours

I'm 18 5' 7" 219 lbs ( earlier this year I was 245 lbs) I sometimes can go 5 hours in between meals and sometimes only like 2-3 before I feel weird. People have said eat something sugary it's just your blood sugar, well that doesn't do anything for me. I don't think it's my blood sugar and neither does my physician. Could it be my body is just digesting food too fast? It has gotten some what better since I started only eating chicken, rice, salad, water, protein bars, other meats, etc.. Is there any hope lol or am I royally screwed?
1 Responses
2169060 tn?1337631232
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hi

I am not sure what you are asking - why is it that you are hungry after only two hours after a meal?

If that is it - yes, what people have told you might be correct. You could by hypoglyemic, which means that when you eat a sugary or high carb meal, your insulin which attempts to utilize the sugar overworks and you are left with a low blood sugar. That means you will be tired, dizzy and hungry - to correct your blood sugar.

The way to deal with it is to eat fewer carbs and more protein and fat - ask you famiy doctor or a dietician for a proper diet - that is lower cab, moderate protein and fat - to control this condition. You will notice that you will feel much better once your diet is stabilized.
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