Aa
A
A
A
Close
HIV - Prevention Forum
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Avatar universal

Fingering, unprotected oral, genital rubbing = HiV?

Dear Doctor, I'm male from Jakarta, Indonesia. On 9 April I got message by a nude lady (unknown HIV status), she gave me unprotected oral for about 5 mins (not really an oral, but more like she kiss one or two seconds on my penis). Then, under the shower, she rub her butt (not her anus) on my penis, untill I ejaculate on her back. Fyi, she also add some liquid soap on her butt to smoothen her butt movement towards my penis. I also finger her vagina (no cut on my fingers), for about 5-10 mins. My upper chess sometime coloured in red since 24 April and fell a little itchy, but some other day the red is gone. Starting on 6 May my fingers (which I used to finger) become very dry and have change its skin surface. Starting 10 May untill today (31 days post exposure) my lips become dry. But there is no light fever, sore throat, or anything. On 21 April (12 days post exposure), I took a test of Anti HiV Method 1: CMIA and the result stated "Non Reactive". On 9 May (30 days post exposure) I took a different test on a different place. The test is Anti HIV (EIA) and the index result is "0.02 Negative" with reference range are =0.25 (Positive).
My 6 questions are: (1) Are my 3 activities mentioned above could transmit HIV? (2) Are the conditions I described above could be considered as ARS? (3) Are the two test results indicate that I am negative of HIV? (4) Based on your view, should I get another test for HIV and when will it be conclusive? (5) The two tests of Anti HiV that I took, what kind of test are they (Rapid, Elisa, etc?) (6) Based on your view, can I continue to have unprotected sex with my legitimate partner or should i wait untill I take the HiV test on a conclusive timeframe? I have not been doing sex at all with my partner since the exposure (9 April). I'm very sorry for my long questions. Thank you very much for all your help doctors and look forward to receive your advice.
10 Responses
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Welcome to the forum.

The most important information in your question is your test results, especially the last one (30 days after exposure).  The HIV tests are among the most accurate diagnostic tests that exist, for any disease.  The results always overrule exposure history and symptoms. It would not matter if you had a very high risk exposure (you did not) or if your symptoms were typical for HIV (they are not).  Your test results prove you did not catch HIV.

To your specific questions:

1) Oral sex rarely if ever transmits HIV, and fingering, hand-genital contact, and the other contacts you mention never do.

2) Your symptoms do not suggest ARS.

3,4) Your current test results are at least 99% conclusive.  However, they were antibody-only tests, which in rare cases may require 6-8 weeks to be positive.  For a 100% conclusive result, you should have a duo test (for both HIV antibody and antigen), which is conclusive at 4+ weeks; or another antibody test at 6-8 weeks.  

5) You had an ELISA and CMIA test.  Both are exremely reliable lab-based (non-rapid) tests.

6) There was no reason for you to stop having sex with your regular partner, and you can safely do so at this time.

I hope these comments have been helpful.  Best wishes--  HHH, MD
Avatar universal
Dear Doctor HHH, thank you very much for your prompt reply/ advice, especially this is during the weekend. Your views gave me a big calm, thank you for your help. As you advised, I will take another antibody test on the period 6-8 weeks (do you think will it be negative? Need your views, please). And another one, just to get clearer, do you think can I have unprotected sex with my partner at present time (when it''s only 99% conclusive), or should I wait untill 100 % conclusive (after I got the result of the 2nd antibody test)?
Finally, I would to appreciate what you are doing here in this forum. What you are doing here are great and good job for human kind. I thank you again and God bless you.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Thanks for the thanks about the forum.  

Your test alone is 99% conclusive.  However, even before you were tested, it was 99.9% certain you did not catch HIV.  Combining the low risk of the exposure plus the test results, the chance you have HIV is under 1 in many million.  Which is why I said you should never have stopped having sex with your partner, and can safely do it now; and also why you can be sure any additional tests will also be negative.
Avatar universal
Dear Doctor HHH, as you advised, I took the antibody test on day 55 after exposure (the test is on 3 June). The result is 0.03, where the range is >=0.25 is positive.
1. Just for confirmation, this kind of test is ELISA, is it? If yes, that would be very reliable right? Because I ask the local health provider what generations this test is, and they said they don't know. Is it true that there is no generation type in regard with this test? Fyi, I took the test at Siloam Hospital in Jakarta, you can browse and give your opinion afterwards.
2. A test on day 55 (after exposure) would you considered as 8 weeks? Could you explain what is the calculation for 8 weeks? I got confused, some say 8 weeks equal with 2 months. But, some say 8 weeks = 56 days. Thus, my test is 55 days and it's 1 day short to 8 weeks (if we agree to use 56 days). What is your opinion in regard with the 8 weeks calculation?
3. Do I need further testing? or can I leave this behind and resume my life as it never happen?
4. Say, I do another test at 3 months, do you have any experience that the test result would be HIV positive, after the 55 days-test is negative?
Thank you very much for your kind help.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Congratulations on the negative test result -- although of course I am not surprised by it, and you shouldn't be surprised either.

1) Those numerical results are typical for an HIV ELISA.

2-4) You need no further testing for HIV. One day (55 vs 56) makes no difference in test reliability.  Below is a link to a thread that discusses time to reliable test results, including reasons for variable advice despite science in favor of reliable results before 3 months. As you will see, that discussion in turn containst links to several others.

http://www.medhelp.org/posts/HIV---Prevention/Testing-Confusion/show/2174457

So all is well; you can move on without further worry.
Avatar universal
Dear Doctor, thank you for your kind support and medical advices that you've given so far. However, this past days it's been so hard for me just to let go from this HIV fear.  Due to that irrational fear, I'm planning to take a final test on the 12 weeks, just for a conclusive result. However, on June 20 I got a flu vaccine (flu shot), provided by my office. After taking the vaccine, I learned that it could interfere the result of an HIV test, as it might misdetect the antibody created by the vaccine as antibody towards HIV. In other online sources, it is also recognized that flu shot could interfere the result of an HIV test. Including in Medhelp, there are some cases that stated having flu shot created Elisa false positive (acwknoledged by the doctor). At this moment, I'm very very very affraid that I wil get a false positive if take the HiV test. But in the other hand, I need to get the final HIV test to keep my irrational thought calm. Please please help me. (1) Is it true that having flu shot could raise possibility to get a false positive on HIV test? If not true, why there are reported cases that flu shot could make a false positive (including in Medhelp) (2) When is the best time to have HIV test after having a flu shot? I very appreciate your time and advice in regard with these two questions.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
1) False.  Neither flu vaccine or any other medications have any effect on HIV testing.

2) It doesn't matter when you have an HIV test after a flu shot.

Ignore non-professional testimony about side effects, flu shots, or anything else. If you limit your web searching to professional resources, you'll have less chance of being led astray.  Better yet, stay off the internet entirely.  Like many anxious persons, it seems clear you're being drawn to sites and comments that inflame your fears, and ignoring or not absorbing the reassuring information that also is there.

That's all for this thread.  It's time for both of us to move on.
Avatar universal
Dear Doctor, thank you for your swift reply.  When you said "Neither flu vaccine or any other medications have any effect on HIV testing", I would like to clarify on the phrase HIV test. In regard with phrase "HIV test", does it mean the Elisa test (screening test) could be positive but then the WB test (confirmatory test) will be negative, so it means a negative HIV test? Or the flu shot since the beginning will not have any effect towards the Elisa test? Because I read online, including in Medhelp, flu shot could make a false positive of Elisa, but then when it is confirmed by Western Blot it will be negative. Thank you very much for your time.
239123 tn?1267651214
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
No medications or vaccines are known to have any effect on any HIV test of any kind.  I don't care what you read online, at MedHelp or anywhere else.  Urban myth, nothing more.

That's truly the end of this discussion.  Anything more will result in deletion of the entire thread.
Avatar universal
A related discussion, Had unprotected oral sex with an escort was started.
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
These tips can help HIV-positive women live a long, healthy life.
Despite the drop in new infections, black women are still at a high risk for HIV, the virus that causes Aids.
What are your HIV treatment options, and how do you choose the right one? Our panel of experts weighs in.
Learn the truth behind 14 common misconceptions about HIV.
Can HIV be transmitted through this sexual activity? Dr. Jose Gonzalez-Garcia answers this commonly-asked question.
A breakthrough study discovers how to reduce risk of HIV transmission by 95 percent.