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HIV Symptoms?


Hi,


On Jan 22nd I had unprotected oral with a friend of mine who swears that she was tested negative about 2 months prior. I did have vaginal intercouse with a condom, but after we finished I noticed that there was blood on the outside of it. She's acting like it was not a big deal, but I've been freaking out ever since. Then, after about 2 weeks (Feb 11th to be exact) I went out to eat and then shortly felt nauseous and began to throw up 3 times. Which was completely weird as I havent thrown up in over a decade. After throwing up I felt like crap and went home and fell asleep.. I felt like I had a fever (didnt check on it) and I literally spent the entire whole next day sleeping until about 6pm. I then developed a clogging feeling in my ear a few days after. My doc said it might of been a stomach bug, but I just can't get over it. Now I question every weird feeling I get and I've actually scheduled a test just to be sure. Does what I describe warrant any need for worry?

BTW this is something I noticed on my arm yesterday.. is this a rash? WTF??
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/26/photo3kn.jpg/

Thanks for any advice

- Mr Freaked out.
3 Responses
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Avatar universal
You never had an exposure to HIV. HIV is not transmitted by oral sex.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
No chance that blood passed through the condom?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
No possible way for blood or anything else to pass through a condom.
Helpful - 0
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