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HIV risk wearing braces - SCARED OUT OF MY MND

Doctor,

I went to a men's sauna some weeks ago.  I wear braces, and there was a small 'canker sore where one brace had rubbed, but it was nearly healed over, but I was aware of it.

I had insertive oral sex with two guys who were also perfoming on other guys;  in addition one of the guys then french kissed me;  I place my tongue over the wound, this was aware of a risk;  I am concerned that he may have cut his tongue on my braces or that semen from some else was still in his mouth when he french kissed me.

I know it sound unlikely, but with three weeks I had a fever and what I thought were symtoms of HIV (after ereading Wikipedia)

Iam scared to death, often having cold sweats and then calming down.  it just seems to go on..

Please

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239123 tn?1267647614
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
I am personally unaware of any patient who was believed to have acquired HIV by oral sex, but of course my experience makes no difference in your risk. It can happen but is very rare.

No more comments will be accepted on this thread unless and until you want to post your test result.
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Avatar universal
I know you have given reassurance - thankyou.  Do you know of anyone who has claimed to have had oral and then tested positive?  Sorry but I am very anxious.
Helpful - 0
239123 tn?1267647614
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
I meant to add that if your symptoms continue, of course you should see a health care provider to learn the cause.  If medical evaluation includes an HIV test, feel free to return with a comment to tell me the result.  I expect any testing to be negative.
Helpful - 0
239123 tn?1267647614
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Welcome to the forum.

HIV has never been known to be transmitted by kissing.  And logically, you must understand that sores in and around the mouth are very common -- so worldwide there must have been billions of kisses between HIV positive and negative individuals when oral sores were present.  And yet no known transmission events.  Oral to genital transmission from oral sex, on the other hand, probably does happen, but that is also to rare to worry about; one calculation is that if the oral partner is infected, there is 1 chance in 20,000 of transmission.  That's equivalent to receiving oral from HIV infected partners once a day for 55 years.

In theory, might there be some small risk in the situation your desribe?  Sure.  There's also a risk you'll be struck and killed by a meteorite -- it happens to a someone, somwhere in the world, every few years.  But you don't worry about that and don't take any precautions to prevent it.  That should be your attitude about the kissing events described here.

Be careful reading lists of HIV symptoms on Wikipedia or any other online source.  Every symptom caused by acute HIV infection is also caused by large numbers of other medical conditions, most of them much more common than HIV.  Despite what you can find on line, symptoms almost never are useful indicators for or against a new HIV infection.

In the future, you should avoid putting yourself in the situation you did -- i.e. any sex at all, even safe sex (which is what you had) without first asking your partners their HIV status and revealing your own.  Even when safe sex is intended, things sometimes get out of hand -- and if you had gone on to anal sex, there might have been substantial risk.  But you really need not worry about any significant HIV risk from the events described.  Of course you can always have an HIV test in a few weeks if my reassurance doesn't settle your fears, i.e. if you would sleep better knowing a test is negative.

Regards--  HHH, MD
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Avatar universal
A related discussion, feedback was started.
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