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Avatar universal

How much blood is needed to infect

I need some serious legitimate advice. I am really concerned for my child. We visited some people and found out one of them has AIDS. They have had it for years and are on meds. Supposedly undetectable viral load. My child had a cut on his leg and kept touching it and making it bleed. Usually not a problem. However, this person with AIDS had a large scrape on their arm and they were picking at it constantly. I saw them use a napkin to wipe off a little blood. My child was playing with a ball with this person. Any chance that HIV could have been passed from one to the other? Please answer, as I am worried. Thank you.
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480448 tn?1426948538
Your child could not become infected in this manner.  For one, the virus cannot maintain its infectiousness outside of the body, and two, one would have to be exposed to a copious amount of blood into a very large, very deep bleeding wound to even be a slight concern.

The only risks for HIV are the following:

1.  unprotected vaginal or anal sex
2.  sharing IV drugs
3.  mother to child

You have nothing at all to worry about.
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
If you're child does get HIV, they can expect to live a full and long life with a key interest in health.  They may eat properly, have regular exercise and join a world wide community who look after each other.

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
READ WHAT YOU HAVE BEEN TOLD. I'm sorry you can't get past this but you have been told over and over again NO RISK.

If someone like yourself had a risk then any antibody test at 3 months is conclusive.
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Avatar universal
FYI - administered a Home Oraquick test on my child. It was negative. Are these home tests accurate? I have read that there are high instances of false-negatives? Is this true? Please answer without persecuting me!!! Thank you.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Move along.

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Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
How can you be so certain that hiv was not transmitted when theoretically it could have? Unfortunately, things happen. I pray to God it did not happen, but theoretically, it can!
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Avatar universal
Yes a professional mental health specialist.
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Avatar universal
I am glad you are so confident. I obviously am not! Do you know anyone I can talk to?
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Avatar universal
What part of your child never had an exposure is it you can't comprehend? It's time for you to move along and get some professional mental help.
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Avatar universal
Rash came and went. What about the canker sores?
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Avatar universal
No it's not HIV if you are concern about the rash take them to see a dermatologist instead of trying to make ridiculous assertions.
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Avatar universal
This event occurred last summer. About two months ago, my child had a rash that started on the back and moved to the chest. The whole torso was covered. Lasted a week. Now, in a little over a week, 4 canker sores! Are you sure this is not hiv?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
. AIDs research has come along way in the last 10 years, but it is still what it is, a Horrible Deadly Disease! Unfortunately, I do fear it... Not so much for me, but for my child! No one deserves this terrible scourge of a disease, but little kids are 100% innocent... I appreciate and respect this forum and all HIV/AIDS related boards, info, etc, as more and more people can become educated through said means. Again, I am sorry I doubt any of you, and I know you all know much more than I do about this subject. I think I will seek some therapy as I am still not convinced my child s safe.
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Avatar universal
No problem, we get these posts all the time. Not a parent myself but I'm sure my parents would have had the same concern, especially my mom.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Sorry I am a pain in the arse! My child is my life, could never forgive myself if I felt that I ever did anything to hurt them, even as unintentional/accidental as it may be!
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Avatar universal
If you don't believe us, post on the Expert forum and get a doctor's answer.

http://www.medhelp.org/forums/HIV---Prevention/show/117

It's understandable that you're having these concerns since you are a parent. My parents had all kinds of far-fetched concerns about me until the day they died. But much like their concerns your concern has no basis in fact.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
No, the only realistic possibility of transmission to a child in a household is through sex abuse. If indeed it was documented that there were children infected in a household it would have been through sexual abuse from the infected parent. And of course the parent isn't going to admit to it and is going to come up with a story. There are simply no other routes of exposure.

If HIV was as easy to catch as you are imaging it to be, it wouldn't be classified as a STD, and half the US population would have it.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
There is nothing to argue about it doesn't happen.
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Avatar universal
I understand what you all are saying, but there have been two reported cases in the US of household HIV transmission. One was from a 5 to a 3 year old, the other from a older boy to his younger step brother. The only thing the experts could think the route of transmission could be was through blood. This is all from a report from the CDC. I am not trying to argue or start a fight, I just want to know what the truth is.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
No, HIV cannot be transmitted from any form of environmental exposure, even if the blood is fresh, because the virus can only be active AND infectious under the conditions INSIDE the body. That is the reason there are only LIMITED circumstances in which HIV can be transmitted, as Nursegirl has outlined. And that is the reason why HIV has NEVER been transmitted inside a household unless unprotected sex or IV drug use was involved. Whatever psychological issues you are having because your child encountered somebody with AIDS, you need to let it go, and EDUCATE yourself on the real risks. This is the year 2013, HIV has been around for 30 years, and there is no reason or excuse for anybody to be phobic about people with HIV/AIDS.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
You read wrong. Unless your child had unprotected penetrative anal or vaginal sex or shared works with another IV drug abuser he didn't have an exposure.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Thanks, but I have read that it only takes a molecule of infected blood to infect someone... I also know that the virus does not live long outside of the human body. My concern is what if fresh blood Watson the ball from the infected individual and it was then instantly touched by my child and they then touched the infected blood to their own cut and or picked their nose or something! I know it sounds crazy, but in that scenario, could infection be passed?
Helpful - 0

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