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Needle Injection

I just went for my first injection on Xeomin (similar to Botox). The injector used a needle to get the product out of the container. Then she went back to get more out of the same container using the same needle she used. This concerned me very much because I am nervous she could have done this with the person before me and blood could have gotten into the product before I was injected. These containers are used with multiple people. I asked her about it and at first she told me it was nothing to worry about and that it was a "special needle". I later called back and she told me that it was the end of the vial and she would never do that if it was going to be used on someone after me. My concern is what if she did do that before, can HIV live in the container with the Xeomin? Thank you
1 Responses
3191940 tn?1447268717
COMMUNITY LEADER
This sounds like a rather irrational concern.  If you don't trust that the clinic is follow proper infection control procedures, you shouldn't go there.  

NO ONE re-uses needles now, and HIV doesn't remain infectious once outside of the body.  Even if someone else's needle had been inserted into the vial, you'd have zero risk of HIV infection since the virus can't survive in that environment.
8 Comments
Thank you so much for your response. I certainly won't be returning there in the future.
I see what you have said about this being zero risk for HIV. I had an appointment with a doctor about this and she said that while it was very low risk, she couldn't say it was zero risk. As a result, she prescribed PEP for me to take for 28 days. I know most doctors aren't experts in HIV, but this was an online telemedicine  place that showed they knew about PrEP and PEP.
You can do whatever you want, but NO qualified HIV specialist would prescribe PEP, or recommend testing, for this no-risk scenario.  No one would prescribe powerful meds for a "what if," imagined scenario either. It is, ultimately, your choice to take it, though.
I would prefer not to take it if that is true. Who would you recommend contacting that would be a HIV specialist? I contacted my state's HIV/AIDS hotline, PCP, pharmacist and Plushcare. All of them told me the same thing, it was very, very low risk, but a risk nonetheless.  I don't see how this is an imagined scenario? I saw her use my used needle in the vial twice, she lied about it being a special needle, so I assume this is something that has been done previously. Yes I know it is a "what if" scenario, but it is based on what I observed.
No one has ever been infected from a scenario like this.  There's not a single case report in the entire 40 year history of HIV.  The people you talked to  are just covering themselves as there is likely a hypothetical risk, and health care providers rarely speak in absolute terms.  I seriously can't believe they gave you PEP.  I don't mean that you're lying about that - I mean I can't believe they made such a poor judgment call.
PEP is generally reserved for those who have had an established risk event, such as unprotected intercourse (usually with an individual who is HIV+ or who engages in high-risk behaviors) or sharing intravenous drug needles.
"Even if someone else's needle had been inserted into the vial, you'd have zero risk of HIV infection since the virus can't survive in that environment." That is all you need to know since the worst that could have happened is dead virus was present. hiv is so fragile that it is instantly dead in air or saliva so the chemical would definitely kill it.
Thank you, based on your recommendation I will not take the PEP.
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