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Please help me.
I had an unprotected encounter with a coworker about 14 months ago.
I have tested for HIV at 6 months and 12 months after exposure. All tests came back negative.
I have heard that sometimes HIV antibodies can take up to a year to appear in blood.
Can I trust the tests I did or should I continue to test again. What guarantees me that antibodies will not appear later than 12 months?
I´m really stressed out and need help.
Whar are majot symptoms for HIV infection?
9 Responses
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Avatar universal
Is your coworker hiv positive?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi worriedandneedhelp,

The oldest test back then take 6 months to be conclusive, since then cdc have revised it to 3 months with the newer tests available. you have been tested at 12 months with modern tests. You don't have hiv.

Hope i have been of help to you.


May God bless


reallyregret
Helpful - 0
1364665 tn?1291607092
Please do some research first before answering people questions here.
Helpful - 0
1364665 tn?1291607092
12 weeks result is conclusive. You dont have HIV. Move on and please use condom always and never share needles.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Are you an HIV expert my friend?
Helpful - 0
1364665 tn?1291607092
hey dude, you don't have any HIV concerns so I dont need to answer your question. Please be sure to give the right advises to people here.
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Avatar universal
Why the dispute with tomMulligan?
Is 12 weeks conclusive? Only in the USA or in all countries? I live in Europe.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
No i just want to find out where he studied medical health sciences.Dont worry you are in the clear.
Helpful - 0
1364665 tn?1291607092
"By: H. Hunter Handsfield, M.D.
Relax.  With a negative HIV test 2 months afterward, you can be 100% certain you did not acquire HIV during the sexual encounter you describe.  Sinus symptoms are not like those of acute HIV infection; and in any case, symptoms NEVER are a useful indicator for or against HIV.  (And by the way, it isn't at all surprising that your "sinusitis" did not respond to antibiotics.  Most cases of apparent sinusitis may not involve actual sinus infection; and most cases probably are not due to bacteria that would respond to antibiotics.  It likely was appropriate for your doc to prescribe antibiotics in the hope they would help, but lack of response really isn't a surprise and certainly doesn't indicate HIV.) "

"By: Edward W Hook, MD

Welcome back to our Forum.  As I told you before, the exposure you describe did not put you at risk for HIV.  A negative test at 90 days provides definitive evidence of what I have already told you- you did not get HIV from the events you described.  I will now address your specific questions:

1.  Believe the test results and don't worry about the lymph node. As I already explained, lymph node swelling is very non-specific and your test results provide definitive evidence that your swollen lymph node is not due to HIV.
2.  No, ARS begins 2-4 weeks after exposure, not at 3 months.  Furthermore, ARS is also, like lymph node swelling, VERY non-specific and most people who worry about ARS have something other than ARS but instead have some sort of non-STD, community acquired viral infection.  Your itching is not ARS.
3.  Yes.  You did not need testing to start with.  Yu do not need further testing.
4.  See above.  ARS does not start this late.

Please, you need to stop worrying about HIV.  Your exposure was no risk.  You have now proved that this is the case with reliable negative tests.  It is time to stop worrying and move forward with your life.  EWH "
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