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Which HIV home test should I take?

I would like to take an HIV home test at 7.5 weeks.  I know that I should wait to 13 weeks for a conclusive result, but would like some reassurance now.  There are two home tests available now in the USA.  The home access test (blood test) and the oraquick test (saliva test).  Is one more reliable than the other for early testing?  A few things I am considering here are: 1) I believe Dr. Hook said that blood tests tend to detect positive results slightly earlier than saliva tests and 2) the home access test is a 2nd generation assay whereas oraquick is a 3rd generation assay.

Thanks!
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Avatar universal
Either is fine, even if you test positive you still have to wait till 12 weeks to get a WB. But you would get an ELISA from a Dr 1st.

Home tests have a higher false positive rate, while they are good if you do test positive it does not mean you are positive.

What was your risk?
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What is the false positive rate for a home test vs. the ELISA one would get from the doctor?  I was under the impression that the Oraquick test was used at clinics too.
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Avatar universal
They are and there is no hard and fast numbers in terms of false positives.

Again, what was your risk?
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Avatar universal
Mutual masturbation.  Not a real risk, but want to be checked anyway.  I may have gotten some vaginal fluids on my penis.

1 in 12 false positives
1 in 5000 false negatives

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/04/health/oraquick-at-home-hiv-test-wins-fda-approval.html?_r=0
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Avatar universal
No risk, no need to test. So if you get a positive result you know it's a false positive.

Those #'s are estimates.
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