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protected sex less than 5 mins with expired condom, didnt break. Still at risk?

3 weeks ago i had protected sex  with a hookerfor few mins. then i checked on the condom's expiry date and unfortunately it was expired. The condom didnt break though. few days later i started having flu and cough with phlegm until now. Since 2 days ago ive been having a onsided sinusitis and this hot/cold fevery sensation but body temp doesnt rise. i lost my appetite, taste, and an elbow pain. sometimes the area under my ear and under jaw stingsThe thing is when the sex happened i didnt pull the condom all the way down so it kinda left few areas of my penis opened, and i also just shaved the penis that day. am i at risk? are these hiv symptoms? im really scared right now
1 Responses
3191940 tn?1447268717
COMMUNITY LEADER
You're fine, and your symptoms have nothing to do with HIV.

Condoms have an expiration date only because they are more likely to break after that date.  It doesn't mean it becomes ineffective if it stays intact - it's more just a warning that you're more likely to experience breakage as time goes on.

Since the condom did NOT visibly break, you were at no risk for HIV and only the head of the penis needs to be covered to protect you from HIV.  That was clearly the case, because if the head wasn't covered it would have come completely off your penis.

Some of your symptoms sound like anxiety, but in any case, they are NOT related to HIV since you had no risk.
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