Aa
A
A
A
Close
Healthy Cooking Community
1.25k Members
1174225 tn?1269632321

اhealth food

hi im 26 and i have highe cholestrol.what should i eat and what is not healthy for me?
4 Responses
535822 tn?1443980380
I think that you need to have low fat food , and the tests they do will tell you the levels and which is higher , if you put this into google you will come up with a list of low fat ,cholesterol lowering foods, you can print that out to refer to it ,very often the doctor or druggist will also give you a list of foods to eat , exercise plays a big part so get out walking cycling, running, the Gym  good luck
483733 tn?1326802046
It is important to reduce all animal fats and to increase omega 3 fats in your diet.  Only eat lean meats but add fatty fish such as trout, salmon, etc. a couple of times a week.  Use olive oil and canola oil for cooking.  Take the skin off of chicken before cooking.  Increase the fiber in your diet and ensure you are eating whole grains and lots of raw or lightly cooked vegetables.  You should also add a fish oil capsule (1000 mg) daily.  Good luck!
Avatar universal
BEST FISH CHOICES
Omega-3s are necessary for optimal physical and mental health. Research indicates that the omega-3 fatty acids found in cold-water fish may help reduce the risk and symptoms of a variety of disorders, and can lower triglyceride levels, increase HDL cholesterol, help minimize inflammation and inappropriate blood clotting, and keep blood vessels healthy.
The best sources are wild-caught Alaskan salmon, canned sockeye salmon, sardines, herring and black cod. I recommend two to six servings per week of fish that are high in omega-3s as part of my anti-inflammatory diet.
Your body needs a small amount of cholesterol to function properly. But we may get too much saturated fat and cholesterol in our diet -- and both raise levels of LDL "bad" cholesterol. LDL cholesterol can cause plaque to build up in arteries, leading to heart disease. HDL "good" cholesterol, on the other hand, helps clear bad cholesterol from your blood. You want to lower LDL cholesterol and raise HDL cholesterol, starting with your diet.
Most Americans eat super-sized meals, with portions that are twice the size recommended for good health. That can contribute to weight gain and high cholesterol. Here's an easy way to practice portion control for a meal: Use your hand. One serving of meat or fish is about what fits in the palm of your hand. One serving of fresh fruit is about the size of your fist. And a serving of cooked vegetables, rice, or pasta should fit in your cupped hand.
Load your plate with fruits and vegetables -- five to nine servings a day -- to help lower LDL "bad" cholesterol. Antioxidants in these foods may provide the benefit. Or it may be that when we eat more fruits and veggies, we eat less fatty foods. Either way, you'll also help lower blood pressure and maintain a healthy weight. Foods enriched with plant sterols, such as some margarine spreads, yogurts, and other foods, can also help lower LDL cholesterol A heart-healthy diet has fish on the menu. Fish is low in saturated fat and high in healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids help lower levels of trigylcerides, a type of fat in the blood. They may also help lower cholesterol, slowing the growth of plaque in arteries. Go for fatty fish,  Just don't drop the filets in the deep fryer you'll negate the health benefits.
A bowl of oatmeal or whole-grain cereal has benefits that last all day. The fiber and complex carbohydrates in whole grains help you feel fuller for longer, so you'll be less tempted to overeat at lunch. They also help reduce LDL "bad" cholesterol and can be an important part of your weight loss strategy. Other examples of whole grains include wild rice, popcorn, brown rice, barley, and whole-wheat flour.
Need a snack? A handful of nuts is a tasty treat that helps in lowering cholesterol. Nuts are high in monounsaturated fat, which lowers LDL "bad" cholesterol while leaving HDL "good" cholesterol intact. Several studies show that people who eat about an ounce of nuts a day have lower risk of heart disease. Nuts are high in fat and calories, so only eat a handful. And make sure they're not covered in sugar or chocolate.
We all need a little fat in our diet – about 25% to 35% of our daily calories. But the type of fat matters. Unsaturated fats -- like those found in canola, olive, and safflower oils -- help lower LDL "bad" cholesterol levels and may help raise HDL "good" cholesterol. Saturated fats -- like those found in butter and palm oil -- and trans fats raise LDL cholesterol. Even good fats have calories, so eat in moderation.
You need carbohydrates for energy, but some do your body more good than others. Whole grains, such as brown rice or quinoa, whole-wheat pasta, and beans have more fiber and raise sugar levels less. These help lower cholesterol and keep you feeling full longer. Other carbs, like those found in white bread, white potatoes, white rice, and pastries, boost blood sugar levels more quickly, leading you to feel hungry sooner, and may increase risk for overeating. Even 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week (20 minutes three times a week for vigorous exercise, such as jogging) can help lower LDL cholesterol and raise HDL cholesterol – although more exercise is even better. It also helps you maintain an ideal weight, reducing your chance of developing clogged arteries. You don't have to exercise for 30 minutes straight – you can break it up into 10-minute increments.
If you're not used to exercising – or hate the thought of going to a gym – just go for a walk. It's easy, healthy, and all you need is a good pair of shoes. Aerobic or cardiovascular exercise such as walking lowers risk of stroke and heart disease, helps you lose weight, and keeps bones strong. If you're just starting out, try a 10-minute walk and gradually build up from there. If you're eating healthy food at home to keep cholesterol in check, don't blow it when you eat out. Restaurant food can be loaded with saturated fat, calories, and sodium. Even healthy choices may come in super-size portions. Try these tips to stay on track:
Choose broiled, baked, steamed, and grilled foods – not fried. Get sauces on the side. Practice portion control by asking for half your meal to be boxed up before it’s brought out.
look at nutrition labels is essential for a low-cholesterol, heart-healthy diet. Try these tips: Check serving sizes. The nutrition info may look good, but does the package contain two servings instead of one?If it says "whole grain," read the ingredients. Whole wheat or whole grain should be the first one. A food with "0 grams cholesterol" could still raise your LDL cholesterol. Saturated fat is the other culprit to watch for.



Avatar universal
3 Fish to Avoid

Large predatory fish. Shark, swordfish, tilefish, king mackerel and white (albacore) tuna may have high levels of mercury. Pregnant women and children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of contaminants, and should avoid these species.
Omega-6 rich fish. Farm-raised tilapia is one of the most highly consumed fish in America, yet it has very low levels of beneficial omega-3s and very high levels of potentially detrimental omega-6 fatty acids. Omega-6 fatty acids are pro-inflammatory, and inflammation is known to cause damage to blood vessels, the heart, lung and joint tissues, skin and the digestive tract.
Farmed salmon. Avoid farmed salmon (also called Atlantic salmon), which is what you typically find in supermarkets, restaurants and fish markets. While less expensive than wild salmon, farmed salmon has a less favorable ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fats and may contain residues of antibiotics and other drugs used to treat diseases in fish farming pens. What's more, levels of PCBs and other contaminants in some farmed salmon have been found to be much higher than those found in wild salmon.
Have an Answer?
Top Healthy Living Answerers
649848 tn?1534637300
FL
Avatar universal
Arlington, VA
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
14 super-healthy foods that are worth the hype
Small changes make a big impact with these easy ways to cut hundreds of calories a day.
Forget the fountain of youth – try flossing instead! Here are 11 surprising ways to live longer.
From STD tests to mammograms, find out which screening tests you need - and when to get them.
Tips and moves to ease backaches
Here are 12 simple – and fun! – ways to boost your brainpower.