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2D and Colour Echocardiography

I recently had  a 2D and Colour Echocardiography which shows:
1) Mild Left Ventricular  Hypertrophy
2) Grade 1 LV Diastolic Dysfunction
3) Aortic Valve is Trileaflets, Highly Degenerated, with normal Cups separations
4) Mildly Sclerotic aortic Valve
And the conclusion was:
MODERATE HYPERTENSIVE HEART DISEASE.
What does this mean?

Do I need a Coronary Angiogram?
10 Responses
11548417 tn?1506080564
It looks like your heart has been suffering from hypertension.
This would explain the hypertrophy and the diastolic dysfunction.
Once your blood pressure is under control, the hypertrophy and LV diastolic dysfunction could improve to normal values again.

Your aortic valve leaflets are degenerated although nothing is said about leakage.
Therefore I assume that the valve still opens and closes well.
Your aortic valve's condition is most likely not caused by the high blood pressure. It will not improve with lowered blood pressure.

You will probably need monitoring (1x/year?) to see if the situation worsens over time.
I see no reason for a coronary angiogram unless you have other heart related symptoms.

11548417 tn?1506080564
@ "You will probably need monitoring (1x/year?) to see if the situation worsens over time."  

I mean the situation of the aortic valve.
Avatar universal
Many thanks for your answer. I really appreciate.

Now, this is the full detail of my medical situation. Some time in July I had chest pains and breathlessness. At the hospital the Doctors did an ECG twice and suspected unstable angina before I travelled out of my country for the Echocardiography.
Below is the complete result of the ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY COLOUR DOPPLER REPORT
1) Mild Left Ventricular  Hypertrophy
2) Trivial Mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation
3)  Mildly Sclerotic aortic Valve
4) Grade 1 LV Diastolic Dysfunction
5) Normal sized left ventricle with good global systolic function, no regional walls motion abnormalities.
6) Normal left atrium
7) Structurally normal mitral valve, no SAM, PROLAPSE, or vegetations
8) Aortic Valve is Trileaflets, Highly Degenerated, with normal Cups separations
9) Right cavities are normal
10) Normal pericardium
And the conclusion was:
DOPPLER and COLOUR FLOW: Grade 1 LV Diastolic Dysfunction
                              Trivial Mitral regurgitation, tricuspid regurgitation
CONCLUSION: MODERATE HYPERTENSIVE HEART DISEASE.

The Cardiologist wrote that I have been found to have ANGINA PECTORIS and will need CORONARY ANGIOGRAM with possible drug-eluted stent.

Let me add here that I was a heavy smoker and I also drank (beer) a lot.
I will really appreciate your further help and advise, please. Thank you.
Avatar universal
These are the drugs I am using now:
1) PALADOX 75MG
2.) CARVEDILOL 3.125MG
3.) ATACAND PLUS   16/12.5MG
4) CRESTOR  5MG
11548417 tn?1506080564
I fully agree with your cardiologist. Your symptoms of chest pain and breathlessness do indicate that there could be some blockage in your coronary arteries.

The golden standard to check the condition of your coronary arteries is with an coronary angiogram.
It is a nearly painless procedure that gives your cardiologist a very good view of the condition of your arteries.

If you still have unstable angina symptoms, have the angiogram as soon as possible and in the mean time, keep nitroglycerin within reach.


In major hospitals they can sometimes do the exploring angiogram and the placement of a stent in one run.  
Avatar universal
Thank you very much.

My Doctor did not give me Nitroglycerin but instead gave me ISORBIDE with the prescription "Use When Necessary." Would that do same thing as nitriglycerin?

I don't have an idea of the average cost of the coronary angiogram, but will discuss it with my Cardiologist later today when I see him on appointment. I am aware though that the procedure cannot be done in my country easily.

Also, I have been sparingly taking Nicotine gum since I stopped smoking 3 months ago. Is that okay?

Many thanks.

11548417 tn?1506080564
What you need is the pills that you put under your tongue when experiencing chest pain. They work within a few minutes.
Is that what you have got?

What country are you from?
Avatar universal
I am from Nigeria.
I will discuss that with the doctor later today but I was told I can put the isorbide under the tongue or swallow whole.

I did not get a response on my use of Nicotine gum, please.
11548417 tn?1506080564
Isorbide is taken up much quicker when put under the tongue than when swallowed, so the first is preferred.

Nicotine increases heart rate and blood pressure and causes vasoconstriction.
Those three are not good for people and certainly not for those with heart disease.

Still, a recent large test found no increased risk for myocardial infarction or death from nicotine patches.
Perhaps this is from the slow release of the nicotine.
Si it seems safe to use the gum. It certainly is much safer than smoking.

Good luck!
Avatar universal
Happy New Year.
Many thanks for your previous assistance. I really appreciate.

I should have gone to Dubai for the angioplasty procedure but for the foreign currency crisis we are experiencing in my country right now.  

Lately I have been experiencing cramps in both hands, sometimes very painful when I try to fold my hands. And the cramps are with me 24 hours. Is this related to my heart condition?
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