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Atrial Fibrillation Stomach Gas & Bloat Relationship?

I saw a post about atrial fibrillation and stomach gas possible association.  I too have the same thing so it may not be all in your head if your suspect this to be the case.  Most dr.'s think your crazy or never heard of this when you even suggest it.  Thats whats wrong with most dr's.  They don't think outside the box and most always treat symptoms with side effect ridden drugs because this is what they learned.  I think we can guess or prognose just as well or better than they can at times particularly if we know something about health and or ourselves.  Never be afraid to speak up because I feel strongly that digestive tract problems are real and translate into other real nasty symptoms like this.  Fortunately we can prevent much of this & need to prevent it from happening. I do feel the more you get afib the worse it can become either physically, emmotionally or both no matter what the cause.  I thought up until now that I may have been the first to discover this but thought I would put this to a POLL since the question already exist out there about the afib gas connection.  I would like to know how many people feel that they get atrial fibrillation and feel that it may be related to gas or full, bloated stomach, intestinal or digestive tract troubles etc?  Any way I also would be interested in what anyone might have to say about it and or what they may have learned from this if they know or even think this to be the case for them and would also like to correspond with others to trade stories and info on what they've learned and done. Be well.  Sincerely, Rich - ***@****


This discussion is related to Stomach Gas and Arrythmia.
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Avatar universal
This is so did heartening- my husband has the bloating-gas-belching-afib-shortness of breathe and wants to die he is so miserable-drs clueless!!!! They say it is anxiety...stomach shows clear; oxygen level great; lungs clear but he's totally miserable and they think it's all in his head-he has a defribulator and is scheduled to have this $300,000 apparatus replaced with another more advanced version that will do all the work for his heart9 don't quote me on the details; but reading all your testimonials that the bloating causes the AFIB I can't see what this VERY EXPENSIVE procedure is going to fix?!?!
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Avatar universal
Yes, I agree completely.  Every single Afib episode I have experienced was preceded by a huge bloating of my stomach.  My personal doctor thinks my gall bladder is bad even though I have had 3 thorough studies of it which showed my gall bladder function to be normal.  I am going to my cardiologist where I expect to me put on the drug amiodarone, a dangerous drug.  I have been to a gastroenterologist , even.  I also cannot find a Dr to believe me in this, or at least to try & figure it out!
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Avatar universal
Hi kennvido,

I get the same issues as you.  Like you said - even moving your arms up in the air would make it go away.  I have a feeling that it could be a hiatus hernia that gets upset and puts pressure on the diaphragm.  I get it exercising as well which is annoying and means I can only go for walks.
Have you found anything that helps you with this yet?  I'm trying!
Brianb
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1 Comments
dis you find any cure , im struggling with the same problems and i no longer want to live. gas gurgling pvc s for 10 months and 7/24 im so tired please help me
Avatar universal
Ok, to keep this short and simple I will say that I almost have no doubt in my mind that gas or "intestinal problems" have caused my heart flutters ECT. I've done this multiple times In the past. I had a large amount of ice cream before bed last night, and was woke up to these episodes about 3am this morning and still lasting until now 8am. Especially when I lay back down. I've also found ways of laying that have made these flutters more frequent also. I'm 29, and in great health with no prior problems. Very sick of the worry and anxiety this has caused me. Seems to get worse as time goes by.
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Avatar universal
I am enjoying this thread!  On occasion I have looked for other folks who think they have a connection between digestion and irregular heartbeats and I know you are exactly right.  I believe it is from a sensitive vagus nerve.

My history:

Fifteen years ago I had open heart surgery for a bad valve.  The operation had some complications and I ended up with a bit of scar tissue in one of the ventricles.  I already had some kind of racing heart issue that would happen every 5 years or so but after the operation it was happening all the time.  I went on Toprol and Amiodarone and received an ICD.  Every once in a while the drugs couldn't keep up and I would go into V-Tach which would trigger the ICD to give a jolt.  I have tried all kinds of things but this is what I know:  Gas and bloating, etc. is one of the main things that will cause my heart to go nuts.

The amiodarone quit working so my heart rhythm is managed by taking 50mg Toprol b.i.d., 400mg Multaq b.i.d., 150mg Mexilitene b.i.d..  I also take 0.5mg Xanax as needed (typically after being shocked by the ICD).

Over time I noticed that if my heart took off, if I could pass gas or burp, I had a pretty good success stopping the problem.

I was also taking omeprazole for heartburn and bloating for about two years!  I started thinking that maybe I had an issue with gluten and it was causing gas and bloating and everything.  So I quit eating gluten and eventually had to quit eating all those grains like oats and even quinoa, although rice does not seem to cause a problem.  Two days after quitting gluten I was able to quit taking omeprazole.  After 4 days I had lost 4 pounds.  Over the last year I have lost 20 pounds.  I eat whatever I want, as much as I want, I just don't eat wheat like stuff.  I am not a big guy anyway so 20 pounds is a lot!

When I quit eating gluten I also started taking Magnesium.  This last year and a half has been so much better on so many levels because of less gas and less v-tach it is unbelievable.

So long story short, for my arrhythmia issues I take:

50mg Toprol b.i.d.
400mg Multaq b.i.d.
150mg Mexilitene b.i.d.
0.5mg Xanax as needed (I usually take half that)

I also take Magnesium supplements (I think this is also a big one)

I rarely take omeprazole

I don't eat gluten

I also try not to eat processed foods

I think for most people, the single best thing I would recommend is to take Magnesium.  If you feel gas is an issue, start looking at removing wheat (gluten).

One final note, I have also noticed that if I am in the right (wrong) position, I can trigger an episode.  Two of those positions are:

Reaching my arm across the midpoint of my body like straining to reach for something on my left using my right arm.

And

Slouching in my chair at work while leaning to the left with my chin almost resting on my collar bone.  I know, sounds weird but…

I hope something in here helps you.  I am positive we have a sensitive vagus nerve thing and gas plays a role in triggering it to speed up or make our hearts beat irregularly.

Good luck!
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5859036 tn?1442075776
I thought I had more of my own story on here than I see. I must have it posted on another forum, i guess.

I have been dealing with A-fib since 2004 possibly but did not know it at the time. From then until now they typically last about 12 hours and I can almost do a countdown, give or take an hour. In fact, the first time it was confirmed was about one month after I had an amplatzer occluder put in my heart a month earlier. This was the recommendation after have a mini stroke a year earlier with no clear reason for it. The specialist admitted that his explanation at best, was a guess because they could find no reason for the stroke. There was a "hole" in my heart, which is quite common, but that did not explain it. And there was a mutant gene in my blood, don't know if that qualifies me as a legit x-men, but it causes the blood to coagulate, but nothing serious. (The hematologist, after reviewing the blood tests concluded that 81mg of ASA was an adequate treatment along with the statin, a "standard" treatment for stroke). The stroke specialist surmised that a clot formed in the lower part of my body (from mutant gene) and passed through the "hole" in my heart. He said that this would probably never happen again even if I did not take medication or have the surgery, but that it might be psychologically better for me. And since Canada pays the bill, they are fine recommending relatively safe patients for surgeries whose successes help with statistical rates of these procedures. But for a month after the surgery I found myself dealing with severe gas issues and strange rhythms, sometimes very slow, at other times fast or irregular. One night, this meant a trip to the hospital where they announced that it was A-fib. I explained that I have had this happen before and the only reason I went to the hospital was because of the surgery and this event was more distressful than previous episodes, usually about 3-4 a year. They did not succeed in bring me out of A-fib and wanted to consult with cardiology to shock me back into rhythm, but shortly after a rather confusing conversation with the cardio intern, the heart returned to normal rhythm and they released me. Later, at a meeting with the surgeon who was doing follow up, he told me that had he known I had A-fib, he would never have recommended surgery as it usually leads to an increase in A-fib frequency. I told him that I had told he and the stroke doctor that I would occasionally have arrhythmias but never knew what was going on. The surgeon looked over the papers in my file and was surprised to see a notation to that effect. 5 minutes later he said that he would probably have still recommended the surgery. I won't bother expressing how frustrating hearing that is, as anyone on this thread is familiar with frustration when it comes to doctors. Anyway, they changed medications which helped settle down my severe gas and now have the occasional A-fib event as before, a little more frequently, but for me it is manageable and never lasts more than 12 hours. Gas related, yes. So many comments here are similar to my own. Some seem more severe and they have my sympathy because after surgery those events were debilitating. And because of this surgery, they changed my meds from ASA and a statin to a statin and Xaralto (raviraxarbon) which is a little more expensive and I'm really cheap and have no insurance. The surgeon thinks the A-fib caused my stroke. But I have met (at my insistence) with another specialist who understands A-fib who disagrees. My surgeon wants me to believe I have been having A-fib events and dont' know about it. But I do. Always. I'm paranoid. I check my heart rate even when i feel good for fear that maybe I don't realize it. But the fact is, when it happens you know it. I think that might make this kind of A-fib different from how other sufferers experience it, as I have read about those who don't know they are A-fib when they are. Of course, A-fib is a concern because if you are A-fib for a long time (I believe 48+ hours), when your heart goes back into rhythm there can be clotted blood in the lower chamber that might reach the brain and cause a stroke. So I've returned to using ASA for anticoagulation and keep some xaralto on hand should I go A-fib for more than 16 hours based completely on my understanding of how the medication works and how long my A-fib events have lasted in the passed. I've also stopped taking the statin because I am diabetic and get my blood tested regularly and if my cholesterol is going out of wack i know it. Naturally, my doctor is annoyed by me, and I understand. But when you are constantly ignored or dismissed by them, you start to wonder who they are really working for? Anyway, its been 2.5 years since surgery. A year off xaralto and statin. Blood work and blood pressure is always on the mark. Although my A1c was a little higher than my doctor liked recently. Another story. Anyway, walk if you can. Everyday. I guess stress as a factor for stroke is best left for another forum.
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5859036 tn?1442075776
I have read about cold water treatment. I think there was an episode of ER or one of those shows where a doctor explained that dunking your head in ice water triggers some mechanism in the brain that results in the regular (and slowed) rhythm returning. Found this on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnrYqxoXzkw
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5859036 tn?1442075776
Its been a little while since I've been on the site to review posts since I joined in 2013 and visited about a year ago. I recently googled some combination of related to atrial fibrillation and there was a sub-category for gas/vegal related links, which surprised me. As I had stated in one of my posts here, echoing what others have said, doctors, in lock step, won't admit any relationship. It's absurd.

I like your idea for developing a more thorough questionnaire.
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Avatar universal
I stumbled across this blog a few days ago and joined the community today. I too have this nasty gas related A-Fib. My episodes started in 2005 following  prostate surgery. Just prior to that I was diagnosed with throat cancer. I had been eating terribly, working too hard, and I believe the combination high carbs and sugar along with broad spectrum antibiotics created my first A-Fib attack. Not to mention the extreme stress from all of the above. I went into the hospital for 3 days while they tried everything they could to understand the heart issue's. They were able to stop it with a combination of IV drips and sent me home with Metropolol. 240 mg a day!! My heart did check out fine, but that Metropolol prescription eventually put me into bradycardia. It was a slow process to recover from all this. I say it was adding insult to injury. The past ten years I have been still struggling with digestive issue's and A-Fib. I believe my intestinal flora was critically damaged by antibiotics, sugar, and stress. I also believe my intestinal track is overloaded with bad bacterial overgrowth. I hate when the A-Fib comes, as it pulls the life out of me. It lasts for many hours, up to 4 days, and is constant. My diet is already as boring as can be, as I have very limited foods I can eat; and because of that it's extremely difficult to hold my weight. When the A-Fib is going, I can lose 5 lbs. in just a couple of days because my heart rate is so intense. My gut has been pretty bad through all this, but I have helped the bloating with HCL capsules ( 650 mg.) It really helped the bowel movements come back to normal. I started getting results when I got up to 4 or 5 pills with my protein meals. I have even tried up to 7 pills without any indication of burning in my stomach;  proving my hydrochloric acid in my stomach has been critically low. So in my case, I can easily say there was more than just one thing going on.
I'd like to thank Rich for starting this blog, as I am going to further my efforts to nip this heart crap in the bud. I'm going to start a high quality probiotic, charcoal, DCL, etc. adding it to my arsenal.
I haven't seen any delocat postings lately, as I have read everybody's from top to bottom. I hope your still checking in from time to time, as your input brings much hope in dealing with this debilitating health issue. I want to thank everyone for their posts. Let's keep this information going because we will help one another in our efforts to cure or improve our gut integrity and A-Fib episodes.
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Avatar universal
Woah! I think there's something to this!!

My breakfast this morning (Aug 29 2015) was a tortilla, a scrambled egg, some leftover squash from yesterday, and a heaping of pinto beans (about 2 servings since I like my beans). About 2 hours later I started noticing mild chest discomfort and a "full" feeling. Took my pulse and it felt slightly elevated, I would guess it was between 96-102 beats per minute, I usually have a resting heart rate of 86-92. Also I had this god-awful dizziness feeling. The dizziness feeling continued for a couple hours.

I am a high-anxiety person so I figured it was just my anxiety yet again (I've had false alarms before due to anxiety and even an ER visit some years back). I went ahead and made me a "Sleepytime" brand tea with chamomile, tilia, and hawthorn. Heated up some hot water in the micro and drank it down, then waited around 30 minutes for it to get into the system. Strangely the chest discomfort remained despite the tea, so I guess it wasn't anxiety afterall using the process of elimination.

The "full" feeling chest discomfort continued into the afternoon. Then, around 2 hours ago I discovered this thread and then I had an epiphany "hmmm, maybe it's gas?". Then I remember I had some generic Kroger anti-gas pills in the cabinet, I went ahead and took one and chased it down with some water. Around 30 minutes ago the strange "full" chest discomfort feeling disappeared completely and my chest area feels "relaxed" again.

There DEFINITELY seems to be a connection between gas/trapped air and chest/heart area sensations. I notice in the past I was always burping a lot when I've had mild chest sensations, and reading through this thread it all seem to make sense now.

Of course, my heart function still seems lacking with the high resting rate and borderline high BP. But at least I know to look out for gas now.
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Avatar universal
I'm now 45 years old but first got this symptom back when I was in my early 20's. I had just exerted myself with some heavy work and had eaten a meal comprising beans. I fell asleep and awoke with palpitations in my chest. Needless to say, I was petrified. I started to cold sweat and felt light headed. I could move around but felt a bit woozy. I didn't know what to do and decided that if this was a heart attack I should get myself to the emergency room. I went to shower but forgot to turn on the hot water and a huge shower of cold water hit me. It was shocking but immediately my fibrillation stopped. I didn't know what caused it but it did not resurface until eight years after.
I was at home and felt this tightness in my chest. It took me back to the first time it happened. I tried breathing shallow because the deeper my breaths were, the more pressure I felt in my chest. As I inhaled, it triggered another episode. At the same time I felt my stomach was bloated and had the desire to burp but it wasnt happening. I took an alka-seltzer and did manage to let out some gas but the fibrillation kept on. I tried hot mint tea, hoping this would assist in relieving the gas pressure. Eventually, after a good session of de-gassing, my heart rhythm regained normalcy.
I went to the doctor the next day to get a general check-up but did not tell him anything that had happened. I asked for an ECG and he complied only to have a normal heart wave result.
It has been some years now and I have learnt to adjust my breathing to avoid 'squeezing' my heart when I am gassy. If I inhale deeply and feel a skip, I immediately and deliberately breath shallower to avoid tripping my heart off.
It seems that in my case, gas pressure causes my atrial fibrillation.

I am able to indulge in work or sporting activity where my heart rate exceeds 160 BPM and feel no side effects or discomfort. I try to avoid gas producing foods but it's hard to really determine or pinpoint perpetrators.
I'm just glad I have figured out the culprit and want to extend thanks to other members who have testified of their experiences as it was of help to me personally.

Mark of the Caribbean
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Avatar universal
HI McAuthor,

did you manage to find any natural remedies that helped as i suffer the same symptoms?

regards,

Tav
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Avatar universal
HI Edward,

I am checking to see how you went with the questionnaire and whether you managed to create one for sufferers to complete as I too suffer from stomach related atrial fibrillation after eating, and sometimes, from fasting as well.

If not I can shoot you a few ideas we can work on to create this questionnaire so that we may be able to send our statistical findings to the appropriate healthcare professionals for further investigation.

This problem needs to be dealt as we all shouldn't suffer like this during an era of modern advancements in medicine.

I will stand by for your response,

regards,

Tav
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Avatar universal
GAS, BLOATING & HEART BEING AT REST.
Yes, there is definitely a connection between Gas, Bloating and AFIB.  Especially not too long after Digestion.  If I have breakfast, and lunch during the day, I do not experience debilitating AFIB.  Mostly because I am up, active and moving around throughout the day.

It is usually after the evening meals when I begin to lay back on a sofa, or bed and read a book, newspaper or watch TV AND MY HEART IS AT REST.  This a double combination for trouble.  Trying to digest food and inactivity of the heart.  AFIB is less troublesome as long as there is some kind of body movement.  Making the heart do a little work.

During a relaxing layback on a bed sometime after eating - Gas will build up while my heart is RELATIVELY INACTIVE.  If I am not forcing blood through my veins (laying down) my heart will at times just begin to go into a crazy episodic AFIB mode which makes me feel terrible.  The heart is resting, relaxing and trying to digest food all at the same time.  IT TRIGGERS MASSIVE AFIB EPISODES while I am relaxed.   Then I have to sit up straight and/or start moving around.

ALMOST ALWAYS AT REST IN THE EVENING
When my heart is at rest in conjunction with bad digestion, the heart goes into a dangerous AFIB mode.  When the heart is working and blood is moving vigorously through the veins (any type of movement) the AFIB is lessened greatly.

                                                 CONCLUSION
There are two (2) contributing factors and the two together can work synergistically and quadruple the effect.  They are:
1) lying down after eating
2) heart at rest and blow flow much relaxed.

I don't know why, but when my heart is complete rest for 1, or 2 hours, it can trigger a crazy mode of AFIB which can come out of nowhere.  It usually happens to me in the evening when laying in a bed relaxing.  This is not to say that won't happen at other times of the day.  IT DOES.  However, an AT REST HEART and/or BAD DIGESTION CAN CAUSE THESE EPISODES.
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Avatar universal
Hi,
I am 46 years old, since 10 years  i am doing brisk walking after small oatmeal break fast and a cup of ginger tea(6:00 AM) after one hour of(at 7:15) small brake fast  I am doing brisk for 45 minutes every day. since five days, when I start walking after 10 to 15 minutes my heart beat fast and after that lots of gases forms and in feel discomfort in my heart but no pain, or fast breathing. some times in evening also becuase of gases my heart beat become fast , I am hypertensive, and I has gastick problem since 8 months, kindly advise me what I have to do.
Thanks Mujahad
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Avatar universal
It's amazing to read these MANY accounts of people suffering from AF connected with bloating. I am one of those sufferers, who has been the rounds of all the tests of my heart with completely normal results. When I suggested that bloating and AF were connected to a cardiologist, he smiled sagely and made NO comment. The truth is of course that current cardiology expertise (and thus diagnostics) is based on either physiological heart issues where the connection is obvious, or on the second diagnostic pathway where the experts will state 'cause unknown'.

I am very surprised that no serious cardiology research centre has not investigated the issue of bloating and AF seriously. The fact that there are so many her with EXACTLY the same symptoms as me, suggests that we can multiply the number of actual sufferers by at least 60%.
I would suggest that we might develop a specific questionnaire on line and produce our own statistical results and then send them to leading cardiology research institutions worldwide. What do you all think and how could we do this?
Cheers..Edward.
Professor Edward Cowie
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Avatar universal
I had palpitations in my lower heart valves long before I went into A-fibs, and in many cases I would cough and it would help. Not always stop the palps, but help with them. I've only had a couple of A-fibs, but I will keep what you say in mind and let you know if it helps should I have another.
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Avatar universal
More to say, sorry if I'm blabbing too much. I've noticed that my posture might also have something to play in this. I'm 6/2 and I sit at a little desk most of the day, slouched in my chair. I weight about 235, about 25 pounds of that the result of quitting smoking. I'm half wondering if my A-fibs come because the way I sit pushes the gas pressure up into the bottom of my heart, thus putting stress on the top portion where I have my A-fib. Just a thought, but one that seems reasonable as I sit here and feel it happening.
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Avatar universal
After reading what some of you have gone through, I've done some thinking about my past and I've come to see things in a different light. Over the last couple of decades I've had some really traumatic stuff happen. I had my head beat in and had bleeding on the brain that caused seizures for a couple of days, my first child died just before he was to be born, my third child was born autistic and at 3 was built like a linebacker. He violently attacked my wife daily until about a year ago. (He was sort of diagnosed with the superbaby syndrome where the brain doesn't tell the muscles to stop growing. His pedi. was lazy and didn't get the tests done to prove he had this, but you need only look at him to know he has it). On top of that I've had a string of "friends" come into my life just to scam what they could off me and my family. Life has been far too stressful.

Several years ago, when I still drank and smoked and guzzled coffee, I would get these weird fits of dizziness and then vomit. It was this weird tickle in my belly that would cause the problem. I wonder if that wasn't the start of one of those hernias people above have talked about.

Regardless, I think it's possible that the level of intensity of stress I've been under as well as the chronic smoking/drinking/coffee I was doing really screwed up my stomach. So if your gut can be one of the reasons for going into A-fib, It's rather likely that it is a stomach issue, rather than the heart itself.

Just hoping I can one day get off these damn meds. I'm not good at taking them.
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Avatar universal
I'm a 44 year old guy who had a very scary AF happen about 7 months ago. I was chain smoking at the time and drinking lots of coffee, then had a hot oil pan explode against my chest. The morning after the explosion I woke to strange feelings in my chest. I had palpitations many times before, but the doctors just shrugged them off because they were in the bottom part of my heart. But then this one came and it hit the top part of my heart. I can't be 100% sure, but I think I was having stomach issues when it happened.

Just a couple of days ago I had missed my pill that takes care of the heart problem, metoprolol, but wasn't completely sure I had missed it, so I decided to wait until it was time to take the pill again, that way I wouldn't be taking too much of it. But I never made it to the time.

My belly felt like there was concrete in it, (to note, I had about half a cup of weak coffee. I rarely drink it now, but I had a busy day ahead of me), and I felt like I was going to vomit several times. This all came on within a few minutes from being perfectly fine and cleaning house. I was hit with AF twice, within about 5-10 minutes of each other. I was in the ER faster than you could kick at me.

I was hawked over for several hours, EKG's and the whole 9 yards. I took a second pill and after it kicked in, I was feeling better.They sent me home and everything seemed fine.

Tonight I have my dose in me, but the bloating feeling came again and even with the medication I started to have palpitations again. Took some antacid pills hoping it will help as it is after 3:30am and the off beats have been stopping me from sleeping.

I talked with my main doctor and mentioned that I thought it might be gas, bringing up something from the movie Doc Hollywood where Michael J. Fox thinks a kid is going into AF and is ready to send him off in an ambulance when suddenly the older doc comes up, gives the kid a drink of soda, the kid burps and all is better.

First he blinked. Then he smiled and nodded, agreeing that this might be gas related and I may NOT have a serious heart issue, though after going out of whack I guess the heart tends to want to continue, so I donno. I do know I don't want to be on the metoprolol if I can help it...I don't like other things I've been noticing the beta blockers have been blocking, though it's not horrible and could be lived with. It's my hope that I can go back to being my normal self with some gas pills rather than adrenalin blockers. We have a fight or flight mechanism for a reason.

I'm set to see a cardiologist for the first time since my first AF back in June, so hopefully he/she will be better able to tell me what's going on. But I can guarantee with 100% accuracy that gas DOES have something to do with what I'm feeling.
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Avatar universal
Someone mentioned sneezing could restore sinus rhythm. Since I also suffer from the same syndrome everyone has mentioned, I read that if you are having a heart attack, cough. I have tried this for the irregular heart rhythm, and it definitely helps. It is logical too.
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Avatar universal
I have suffered from AFIB most of my life and it is always brought on by a set of know triggers:
1.) Indigestion and excessive gas, particularly brought on from cereal with milk in the morning. or very spicy foods mixed with dairy.
2.) Putting some unusual pressure on your chest: laying on my left side while sleeping, leaning or laying on my chest when trying to fix a car for example.
3.) Too much alcohol - in excessive of 4 drinks in a 3 hr period
4.)  Caffeine
5.)  Dehydration

These are 5 "big five:.
If I watch these I stay out of AFIB
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Avatar universal
Try charcoal pills from the health food store.  Charcoal pills provide much relief for gas.  Many people are admitted to hospital for heart issues when what they really have is gas.
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1 Comments
Charcoal pills have helped me on many occasions when I was literally blocked up with gas. They really work.
Avatar universal
I agree with most what you say.Have just come out of hospital again having suffered tachycardia .My abdomen feels tight...and bloated sometimes and then my heart kicks in to beating very fast usually when I'm seated or lying down....but can happen when I feel bloated tummy when walking .Not chest pain  but funny feelings in chest and arms ..don't like the feel of clothes on my skin.Lots of burping at anytime .stretching my body in certain positions helps to slow the heart have had episodes of this for 25 years am 50 now.Been diagnosed with a hiatus hernia  , had heart checked and nothing was found ...can swim for ages..but do burp when swimming...but no AF ..it can happen at anytime and have even tab,eats for anxiety.but the bloody symptoms of all this are the cause of my anxiety not the other way round.....doctors.....always have seemed to think its stress but I know better
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