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Avatar universal

Cardiolite Stress Test Accuracy

Dear Cleveland Clinic,
Eight years ago I had a heart attack because of a 95% blockage in my LAD.  At that time I had a stentless angioplasty performed. Each year I have a Cardiolite Stress Test to check the progression of the lesion.  Each year the stress tests results are normal and similar.  However, scar tissue still shows up on the nuclear stress test.  Eventually will the scar tissue disappear, worsen, or stay the same?  My daily medications are atenolol, vasotec, imdur, aspirin, hydrochlorothiazide, and lipitor.  I exercise(jog) daily for 30 minutes and my cholesterol levels are total:138; LDL:58; HDL:67; and triglycorides:65.
Thanks,
Cody
2 Responses
239757 tn?1213809582
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Cody,

Thanks for the post.

Generally the scar tissue should not change over time. Once heart muscle is dead....its dead.  What your physicians are looking for are hints of recurrence of stenosis at the site of your previous procedure or new blockages forming.

The most important thing for you is lack of symptoms. Without symptoms, and your good lifestyle gives you a favorable prognosis.

Keep it up.

Avatar universal
Hi Cody,  I have scarring also seen in the very distal LAD.  I was told the other day...it will always be there.  They saw this on a Stress Echo and also on the Nuclear Cardiolite.

Good Luck to you.
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