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Chest congestion with right arm pain?

My boyfriend had a sinus infection with associated headaches and dizziness that traveled into the ear, the the neck and now into the chest a few days ago. He waited on antibiotics because he previously had C. Diff so stayed with homeopathic remedies but to no avail. Now that it has spread, he started lavoquin about two days ago. Since taking it, his chest pain and ear blockage has improved but he now has a new right arm pain that seems very random. This is very concerning to me now because this is symptomatic of heart att. He cant afford to go to the er and is hoping that the pain would go away but im scared and feel helpless cause he is so stubborn. He doesnt smoke cigarettes, only medical marijuana through a vaporizer but he has definitely been under alot of stress. He does not have high blood pressure or cholesterol. May any of this be side effects of lavoquin or his chest congestion, which now im questioning if it is a congestion anymore. How can you decipher chest pain from chest congestion vs. pain from heart con concerns
Best Answer
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hello and hope you are doing well.

If it is angina, then the pain is is usually retrosternal (mid chest or slightly to the left) and is usually brought on by exercise and relieved by rest. It usually radiates down the left arm. If the chest pain is due to chest congestion, then it is aggravated with coughing and movement. The constant coughing could cause muscle strain and chest pain. Sometimes the pleura, the lining of the chest cavity and lungs can get inflamed causing pain with coughing. Only a consultation with your primary care physician can help diagnose the cause.

Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
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Avatar universal
Thanks but upon further research levoquin side effects include arm pain so at the moment i am attributing his symptoms to that as his chest and arm pain has gone way down sine use.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hello and hope you are doing well.

Good to see his symptoms improving. It could a side effect of levaquin, as this can cause swelling and pain in the joints, this is more so if he is prone for joint/tendon problems such as tendonitis and bursitis. It should resolve once the medication is stopped. Discuss these symptoms with your consulting doctor he may change the dose or the medication.

Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
Helpful - 0
144586 tn?1284666164
Yes. The arm pain can be due to the Levaquin. It is a very punishing antibiotic. The symptoms usually, but do not always disappear. Mine lasted for nine months. And I foolishly requested the Levaquin myself! I am reminded of the Space Odysessy script where Hal the computer says: "I seem to be making a fee bad decisions lately".  Curiously many people take Cipro without problems (a drug of the same class) but have no tolerance for Levaquin.
Helpful - 0
237039 tn?1264258057
With all that said, in the future, whether he can afford the ER or not, it's a good idea to have any new chest pain evaluated. The finances can be worked out later, the effects of a heart attack may not give any other option.  And, yes, caregiver, I prefer Cipro to Levaquin because of the cost difference.
Helpful - 0
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