Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Child had abnormal ekg

My daughter, who is 11, had some blood work and an Ekg done recently because of some migraines and a fainting episode. The Ekg came back showing possible heart enlargement. I'm waiting around for the doctors office to get her an appointment with a cardiologist. In the meantime, I am extremely worried. The doctor tried to tell me, because I was very upset, that EKG's are not very accurate at detecting heart enlargement in children, and that it was like a 99% chance that it was off/misleading... I'm just still very worried. Any experiences with false reading on ekg?
2 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
And I forgot to mention that the bloodwork, which I believe was a CBC, was all normal.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Yeah, EKG is really not great unless unless you have profound infarct or arrythmia.  There are many false positives and false negatives.  I'd have her due an echo or cardiac mri and make sure all is good.

If you do an echo ask for bubble study to make sure a pfo or asd isnt being missed.
Helpful - 0
2 Comments
We went to the pediatric cardiologist and got a new ekg and an echo and everything looked normal.
Did they do the echo with bubble to check for a shunt?
Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Heart Disease Community

Top Heart Disease Answerers
159619 tn?1538180937
Salt Lake City, UT
11548417 tn?1506080564
Netherlands
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Is a low-fat diet really that heart healthy after all? James D. Nicolantonio, PharmD, urges us to reconsider decades-long dietary guidelines.
Can depression and anxiety cause heart disease? Get the facts in this Missouri Medicine report.
Fish oil, folic acid, vitamin C. Find out if these supplements are heart-healthy or overhyped.
Learn what happens before, during and after a heart attack occurs.
What are the pros and cons of taking fish oil for heart health? Find out in this article from Missouri Medicine.
How to lower your heart attack risk.