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Avatar universal

Discomfort when standing up

This past year I have been having palpitations, and they have checked my heart for a number of things. I have had ecgs, holter monitoring and an ultrasound of the heart. Everything has been fine. Not even a single extrasystole on the holter. I have always said "no" when they've asked me about chest pain, but I have realized that that was not quite true. I DO have discomfort in my chest, but only periodically, and only when staning up after sitting for quite a while. When i stand up quickly, i feel pressure in my chest and head, and my heart beats really, really hard. Not fast, but hard. It goes away after about ten seconds, but it is horribly uncomfortable when it happens. I know that I have orthostatic hypotenison. Could this be the cause of this? Should I be worried, or would the tests I have already had have shown something if this was something to worry about? I can't stop worrying about it.
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Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Based on the symptoms you have described, it is unlikely the “chest pain” is from a blockage of your coronary arteries (“angina”).  It is more likely that you have a strong nerve reflex response to standing up -- it is not uncommon to have feeling of palpitations, especially with standing vertical after prolong sitting or lying.  Often this is related to fluid status inside your vascular system (i.e. dehydration); occasionally this could be related to issues of the autonomic nervous system.   Conservative treatments include adequate hydration (avoid alcohol and caffeine) and compression stockings (available over-the-counter, OTC). If the symptoms are very bothersome I would recommend an evaluation by a cardiologist for “autonomic dysfunction”.  
Helpful - 1
Avatar universal
orthostatic hypotensioin  sounds like your problem
Helpful - 0
1124887 tn?1313754891
I've had this symptom too. It's really annoying. In my case it happened more often after driving for a long time, during stress, etc, but now it's more or less gone.

From what I understand, your blood runs down in your abdomen and legs, and the heart speeds up to compensate, but the body (ANS system) consider this increase in heart rate to be "inappropriate" and the vagus nerve kicks in. The chest pain is then caused by various mechanisms happening when your heart gets very full of blood. A lot of mechanisms are activated to prevent you (and everyone else) to faint due to low blood pressure when standing.

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
alttile more salt drinkl water  an exercise in cool temperture  keep u from fainting an check in to some embolism stalking to keep your blood pressure up make sure u do not u have high blood pressure before doin these thing cause they will raise it  go see see nero or a caqrdio some to help u i will get worse if u dont treat it u need a tilt table test
Helpful - 0

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