Aa
A
A
A
Close
Heart Disease Forum
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Avatar universal

How to taper off Atenenol?

Thank you for taking my question. Yes its about those dreaded PVC's again but this time a question about Atenenol and tapering.  I am male, 40, no CAD, all tests normal- echo, stress, holters etc ...but do have PVC's and many times runs of two or three in a row but for the most part get several hundred per day lasting a few days to now for the first time 2 months straight with some relief days here and there.

Questions: I was told by my cardiologist that i could take atenenol 12,5 mg on a prn basis (as needed) to help alleviate the symptoms. I have been taking the atenenol for about 35 days straight now but i cant say its helping all that much- it keeps my heart at a slower pace which is good because with the PVC's i often get bouts of tachy. Question #1: Thus, how do you taper when only taking 12,5 mg of the drug per day and how is it done safely? I do notice by the 21 st hour after having taking the drug before my heart paces around 90-95 until the next dose three hrs later and then goes back to 70 or so. Question #2: Can one build tolerance on such a small dose? Question #3: Is it safe to work out taking a small dose of beta blocker?
Question #4: Should I expect a rebound by solowley eliminating the drug - ie: tachycardia because i no longer have he beta blocker in my system? Question #5: How many days or weeks is normal rebound ie: tachy until the heart goes back to its normal rythum or bpm which mine is around 80/bpm w/out the drug?

Thanks Very much-

26 Responses
74076 tn?1189759432
Hello,

Question #1: Thus, how do you taper when only taking 12,5 mg of the drug per day and how is it done safely? I do notice by the 21 st hour after having taking the drug before my heart paces around 90-95 until the next dose three hrs later and then goes back to 70 or so.

It is safe to just stop 12.5 mg of atenolol.  That is a very low dose.

Question #2: Can one build tolerance on such a small dose?

It depends on what you mean by tolerance.  If you mean less side effects, yes, that can happen.  It will not stop blocking the beta receptors.  

Question #3: Is it safe to work out taking a small dose of beta blocker?

Beta blocker alone should not stop anyone from working out.  If  you take a beta blocker because of a severe cardiomyopathy, you should probably be careful.  For PVCs it is fine to work out.

Question #4: Should I expect a rebound by solowley eliminating the drug - ie: tachycardia because i no longer have he beta blocker in my system?

You will either notice a return of your heart rate to baseline or a temporary slight increase in heart rate.  This is should not be a concern though.

Question #5: How many days or weeks is normal rebound ie: tachy until the heart goes back to its normal rythum or bpm which mine is around 80/bpm w/out the drug?

IF you have normal kidney function, I would not expect a rebound tachycardia from that dose.  You may notice that you run a littel faster (10 to 20 bpm), but a not true tachycardia (>100).

Overall I would say just stop the atenolol and see what happens.  If you notice symptoms, you can try breaking it in half for a week and taking 6.25, but I doubt this will be necessary.

Good luck and thanks for posting.
84483 tn?1289941537

I take up to 100mg of atenolol daily in divided doses, like you when i have pvcs they are usually followed by a tachycardic event. I think it is very important to be active while taking beta blockers , it can help to ward off some of the side effects from them, also it can suppress exercise induced pvcs and tachycardia. I find brisk walking for about 30-45 minutes at least 5 days a week to very helpful. Good luck.
Avatar universal
I took 12.5 atenolol for about 2 weeks and didnt taper off, and i noticed my pvcs were worse for about a week or two. Drugs really didnt help me much so i quit taking it; what finally helped my palps was regular excercise. ive been swimming or jogging 2-3 times a week; after a couple weeks of doing that i bet ive reduced my pvcs by about 80%. i still notice them once in awhile though, especially if i havent got much sleep or if im stressed, but i use to notice them dozens, maybe 100s of times each day and since ive been doing that ive had a couple days i havent felt 1, and most days i feel less than 20. note you arent suppse to excersice when tapering off atenolol
Avatar universal
I, too, was taking 12.5 mg. of Atenolol and HAD to taper off as my heart rate took off when I quit cold.  I am medication sensitive and it took me approximately 10 days to get off the medication with no problems.  Split the tab in half for a few days, then into quarters for another few days, then the quarter tab every other day and then stop.  I wish I could have continued taking Atenolol as it worked great for me for high blood pressure but I have peripheral vascular disease and beta blockers and PVD don't work together (as I found out the hard way - considering my doctor said it would be OK .........!)  You'll be fine stopping it from the low dosage you take.
Avatar universal
How about toprol xl 50mg..can you quit that cold turkey?
I been on it for a week following 5 weeks of Inderol 80....and I am real dizzy and have more pvc's not less........can I quit them
Avatar universal
tks for the answers Doc... just what i thoought. PVC's ...gosh i wish someone had something for these i would pay almost anything to get them to stop.

Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Is a low-fat diet really that heart healthy after all? James D. Nicolantonio, PharmD, urges us to reconsider decades-long dietary guidelines.
Can depression and anxiety cause heart disease? Get the facts in this Missouri Medicine report.
Fish oil, folic acid, vitamin C. Find out if these supplements are heart-healthy or overhyped.
Learn what happens before, during and after a heart attack occurs.
What are the pros and cons of taking fish oil for heart health? Find out in this article from Missouri Medicine.
How to lower your heart attack risk.