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Peripartum cardiomyopathy

Hello!

I am currently 28 years old. I had my daughter May of 2007. The day after delivery an echo found that my heart had dilated. I was diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy. My EF is 15% under what it should be.

Fast forward to today. I just found out I am pregnant. I do not believe my heart has returned to normal function but it has been about a year since my last echo. My question is, what are the chances that I can carry this pregnancy successfully? Also, what are the chances that I will go into heart failure because of this pregnancy?
1 Responses
242509 tn?1196922598
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
That depends on whether or not your heart function has returned to normal. Even if it has, however, it is very likely to diminish again to its low levels and may cause you to develop heart failure, loss of pregnancy or even death. For this reason most patients with dever LV dysfunction, especially if related to pregnancy are advised not to have new pregnancies. The actual probability of you carrying this out to delivery is not know, as there has never been a randomized trial ( nor could there ever be one). Most medications known to help cardiomyopathy are also contraindicated in pregnancy. I would ask to see a cardiologist that specializes in this problem sooner rather than later.
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