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Avatar universal

Question about Heart Murmur

I have been getting chest and jaw pain for quite some time now.  I also have pain in both my armsa nd shoulders, but I feel it more in my left arm and shoulder, and at times I feel the pain in my left side of my face.  My doctor said that I have a heart murmur and I am scheduled for an echocardiogram next week.  My question is: Will the heart murmur go away?  Also, I play Rugby, will the heart murmur interfere with Rugby?
Thank you for your time.
Cassie
32 Responses
367994 tn?1304957193
A heart murmur is an additional sound heard with a stethoscope, and the sound comes from the backflow of blood through a one-way heart valve.  Often the murmur is not serious and does not progress and will not go away.

An echo will determine the condition.  If serious the condition will reduce the heart's output with each heartbeat and there can be chest pain, shortness of breath, fatique, etc.

.
Avatar universal
Thank you for replying.  Can I still play Rugby with a heart murmur?
Cassie
367994 tn?1304957193
Having a murmur is not considered a reliable source to evaluate your heart valve's condition. If you have some heart valve leakage, you should be able to play any sport without any problems.  
Avatar universal
Definitely keep the appointment for the echo next week.  I wouldn't try to play rugby between now and then.  Not every heart murmer is associated with the kind of pain that you are having.  To me, what you are going through suggests that the heart is struggling to overcome problems associated with the valve defect that is causing the murmur.   In other words, it's not the murmur itself that is causing you difficulty.  It's the fact that you have a bad valve.  The heart is not working right.  The murmur is just a sound; it's the least of your problems.  Finish your evaluation and see what treatment the doctor recommends.  

Good luck.  Lots of people have worked their way through situations like this and have come out well on the other side.  Just don't ignore it.
Avatar universal
Thank you for replying.  My doctor did find a hear murmur.  Can a heart murmur cause a problem with one of my valves?
Cassie
Avatar universal
My last post is kind of misspelled.  Sorry.  It is supposed to say My doctor did find a heart murmur.
Avatar universal
My doctor found the heart murmur though the stethoscope and I have to get an echocardiogram done to makem sure it doesn't become serious.
Cassie
Avatar universal
Yes, a heart murmur is the sound that is made by a heart valve that is not working properly.  

Some murmurs are the result of blood leaking backward through the valve.  Blood is supposed to go through the valve in one direction only, to keep your circulation flowing the way it is supposed to.  When the valve doesn't close completely with every heartbeat like it is designed to do, then blood can wash back in the wrong direction, and the blood makes a sound when it does that.  

Another type of heart murmur comes from a valve that is partially blocked, and the blood makes a noise when it squirts  through an abnormally small opening.  

Either way, it's not that the murmur causes a problem with the valve.  It's that you have a problem with one of your valves already, and the murmur is an abnormal noise that tells your doctor that the problem is there.  

The purpose of the echo test is to show a video picture of the moving valve, so the doctor can see exactly what the problem is.  At that point, he should be able to tell you what treatment he recommends.
Avatar universal
Dont let everyone scare you.   Heart murmurs are common (especially systolic).   Most of the time they are benign (meaning of no significance)    A lot of innocent murmurs are not from backflow but from forward flow (antegrade) where blood is moving faster out of either the pulmonary or aortic valve.   A normal echo (if they find nothing else) means this is probably a physiologic murmur caused by forward flow (Flow murmur)    That means your heart is perfectly normal.    Do some google searching and wait to see what they tell you at your appt.   Let us know!
Avatar universal
What marksman says is true enough, as far as it goes.  Some murmurs are considered "innocent" and have no real functional significance.  

In cmasse's case, it is not the simple fact of a murmur that is concerning.  It is the fact that she has both a murmur and persistent chest pain that radiates into her arms and jaw.  She should not panic, and I hope I have not precipitated panic, but she should be concerned enough to take the problem seriously.  If the echo appointment is scheduled for next week, that is not very long to cut back on strenuous activities such as rugby.  Hopefully, this will turn out to be nothing, and we can all have a good laugh about it later on.  But a symptomatic murmur is regarded a bit differently from one that has never caused any problems.  Should the echo turn out normal, which we can all hope it does, she will still need to understand why she has the chest pain.
Avatar universal
What do you mean "Hopefully, this will turn out to be nothing, and we can all have a good laugh about it later on"  Laugh about what?
Cassie
Avatar universal
It's just an old saying, Cassie.  When you go to a lot of trouble about something that turns out to be nothing, then you can laugh about it later on, if you have a positive attitude.  Better to laugh about it than to get upset.  That's all it means, when people say that.

Marksman's point is well taken that people shouldn't try to scare you, and it's not my intention to do that.  Keep your appointment for the echo and see what comes of it.  Take it easy in the meantime.  It's possible that the doctor might want more tests, after the echo.  If so, follow through with the process and see if you can't get some relief from the chest pain.

Let us know how things go.  I will be thinking about you.
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