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Sharp Chest Pain

I am a pretty healthy 25 year old female.  I am fairly slim weighting 108lbs and being 5'4" tall.  I am fairly active trying to work out two to three times a week, non smoker, and occasional social drinker.  However I have been having sharp quick chest pains for the past three years.  These chest pains are just to the left of my breast bone right where I heart is.  I have had numerous EKG, a treadmill stress test where they looked at my heart at a resting rate and at an increase rate, and I have had a CT of my chest area.  All tests have come back normal.  It is at a point now where I just want these pains to go away.  Lately they have been coming on more frequent and strong.  They happen real quick, stop me from whatever I am doing, and make me catch my breath.  Now I feel overall sick and weak at times throughout the day, feeling like I am breathing heavier just sitting at my desk at work.  What steps should I take now?  Do you think I should ask to wear a heart monitor so we can see what my heart is actually doing at the time of this pain?  Or do you think it could not be heart related at all? Maybe something muscle related? Or stomach related?  
4 Responses
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237039 tn?1264258057
Have the doctors suggested that it might be the stomach or lungs?  Do you feel that you may be having skipped or irregular beats with this pain?
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367994 tn?1304953593
The chest pain could be related to heart vessel spasm.  This condition wouldn't be picked up with a test unless it occurs at the time. You should monitor your heart activity and try and capture the event to rule out a heart problem.  

There is a condition that occurs with young adults and it is called Precordial Catch Syndrome (PCS).

Can you rule out PCS?  It manifests itself as a very intense, sharp pain, typically at the left side of the chest, which is worse when taking breaths. Patients often think that they are having a heart attack which causes them to panic. This pain typically lasts from 30 seconds to a few minutes. Though some episodes last just a few breaths, in rare cases they can persist for up to 30 minutes. In most cases the pain is resolved quickly and completely.

The cause of PCS is unknown. The the pain may originate in the parietal pleura of the lungs. The pain is most likely not of cardiac origin.

"There is no known cure for PCS. However PCS is also not believed to be dangerous. Therefore PCS is generally not seen as a problem. Perhaps the worst part about PCS is the fear that this chest pain is an indicator of a heart attack or other dangerous condition, so therefore a correct diagnosis of PCS is a relief. PCS should only occasionally interfere with normal activity, and there is no reason to use any form of medication".
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Avatar universal
I do have acid reflex so i have had one doctor say it is related to my stomach.  But the medine I am taking for my stomach doesn't seem to relive the pain.  I try to find a trend with it but it is very random and i havent been able to link it to anything.  I think i will bring up PCS to my doctor next and ask to be monitored on a heart monitor for a day.  I think that once I am on a heart monitor when it happens and if it still is normal then I will feel pretty confident that it is not a heart related issue.  Thank you very much for your input.  
Helpful - 0
367994 tn?1304953593
Yes, to rule out a heart problem is the best decision going forward.  Keep us posted, and thanks for sharing.  Take care.
Helpful - 0
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