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Small 55% blocked atery

Hello, and thankyou in advance for answering my question. During an exploratory catherization procedure a small "Clinically unimportant ramus intermedius vessel" was found to be blocked at 55%. I asked what he would do and he said it was too small to put a stent in. What, if any, can I do myself to reduce that blockage. I am on Toporol XL, Plavix, Crestor, and Lisenopril, plus aspirin,on a daily basis. I am exercising regularly. I am going under review for recertification for my medical certificate to fly as I am an Airline Pilot and I hear unofficially that the FAA does not recommend anyone with a blockage of more than 50%. I did have 3 other stents put in place back in Feb 2004 and they were found to be widely patent. Other than taking my Meds and exercising is there anything else I can do to help my situation? Thanks again, you provide a wonderful service.
1 Responses
74076 tn?1189759432
Hi Michael,

It sounds like that is a pretty small artery -- and if it is that small they probably don't need to open it.

There is good data for Atorvastatin (Lipator) 80 mg causing plaque regression compared to simvastatin (Zocor).  The regression data is by intravascular ultrasound quantitating the plaque volume.

http://www.forbes.com/home_europe/2003/11/12/cx_mh_1112pfe.html

Lipator has not been compared directly to Crestor for plaque regression.  If it were me, I would prefer to be on Lipator because the data is better for now.

As always, exercise helps improve your cholesterol profile.

Below is a link discussing the benefits of the Mediterranean diet.  It may be of benefit.

Good luck.


http://www.postgradmed.com/issues/2002/08_02/curtis.htm

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