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Avatar universal

beta blocker and exercise

I am a 48 year old male, doing an intense at home exercise program.
I take a beta blocker each morning for hypertension.
However, I notice that when I exercise my heart rate either doesn't get as high as desirable or takes much longer to get there.
In fact, the last time I had did an echo stress test my heart rate took an extra long time to get to the desired level.  The cardiologist told me that next time I should take the beta blocker after the stress test.
Would it be advisable on a regular basis to take the beta blocker AFTER exercising as well in order for my heart to get a better work out?
16 Responses
367994 tn?1304957193
We all have our heart reduced with a beta blocker.  I haven't heard of taking a beta blocker after the exercise routine. My understanding is use your resting heart rate as your guide, figure out the decrease in your heart rate as a result of the beta blocker. For example, if your resting heart rate is 70 without a beta blocker and 50 with a beta blocker, that’s a difference of 20. When calculating your target heart rate, subtract this number from the result. That’s your “beta blocked” target heart rate and is equivalent to what your target heart rate would be without the beta blocker.

I have been following that protocol for more than 7 years without any ill effects.  
Avatar universal
Try both ways. Take it a couple of times before and then after. Your body will feel the different if it is any. And that is your answer. Can’t say from my own experiences for me doesn’t matter when I take my   metoprolol. But our bodies behave differently and telling us the only truth what is a truth for us as an individual.
Avatar universal
:) I havent seen your post. I think my body is like a horse, can not feel the different. :)
367994 tn?1304957193
Hi vienna, we all may not have a distinquishing physical reaction felt with known or unknown signs with target heart rates.  The target heart rate is supposed be the most benefical for the heart.  I don't know the basis of a target heart rate being 220 minus age but that is the general consensus.

Frankly, I don't relate my exercise with the heart rate.  I base the exercise on the number of METs (4.4 for me) with a gauge included with health center's equipment that shows the degree of exertion.  I know after about 7 years what is the appropriate exertion. I don't push myself to any maxium exertion!...I do a brisk walk (3.6 mph) for 20 minutes 3X, week lift weights, and flexibility routine.  Flexibility is probably the most under rated exercise routine, as many individuals fall due to a slow reflex to an imbalance situation, or have an loss of balance abnormally from not doing correct exercise for flexibility.
159619 tn?1538184537
COMMUNITY LEADER
Interesting, I have been discussing exercise with our cardiologists for a few days. My routine has always been based on heart rate. I walk at 4 mph (wish I could run but these mechanical knees prevent that) at an incline of 4 -5  for 45 mins 3- 4 days a week and 30 - 45 mins the rest of the week at 5 mets. Both routines will yield a heart rate of 130-140 (80-85% of max). I like to push to 10-11 mets on the bike for a few mins which will give me 90 - 95% of my max.

In asking the cardiologists which is better, they have all told me to base your work out on heart rate, mets usually benefits athletes but not the everyday person. I like using heart rate as I know exactly what my heart rate will be at each setting so I can bring it up and down in a controlled manner. Also, a couple times a week I'll also track my blood pressure when working out, just to make sure I have a proper BP response, it's interesting to hear what works best for each person.

For the OP, Ken is correct and that is how you should calculate the heart rate you want to achieve. Also, I would not advise taking your BP meds after working out, they are taken in the morning for a reason so before you try that discuss it with your doctor.

Jon
159619 tn?1538184537
COMMUNITY LEADER
Clarification, I use a treadmill 3-4 days a week and neglected to add that I use the bike the other days. Main thing is I work out daily a 130 - 140 BPM.
Avatar universal
Hi Ken, thanks for your note! I honestly base my exercise on my mood.:) For me regularity is the most troublesome.  When I do not do anything for 2-3 days, I feel bad about myself then work out with more division and passion.:) Lately only kundalini yoga.:) It is more than exercise and lower my BP, I know just from feeling it.   I almost never check my heart rate or BP anymore.
Going  back to walking-running-swimming all on my list, now the snow and cold is good excuse not to.
  When I do start those again maybe I will pay attention  for the numbers that you mentioned . Thanks!
367994 tn?1304957193
I had/have a problem with getting my heart rate above 125... My stress test was stopped at 7.2 METs after about 5 minutes 6 years ago and so I go more by the physiological effects seen by stress test and not get higher than I am comfortable.

The EKG with the stress test showed depressed st segment and that is supposed to represent ischemia and that was the cause for stopping the test. That could mean my heart cells were not getting enough oxygenated blood at 7.2 METs although I wasn't experiencing angina.
Avatar universal

Am I missing something?  why do you want to get your heart rate up?  If you are able to exercise comfortably at a low heart rate great...that means your cardiovascular system is working well.  the lower your heart rate the better even during exercise.
Avatar universal

perhaps I missed the fact that you want to achieve your target heart rate...again you don't have to reach that target for cardio-vascular fitness.  that is usually the guide for upper limit.  
159619 tn?1538184537
COMMUNITY LEADER
When you exercise, you set your level based on your goals. It is true that the most cardiac benefit comes at rates between 50 and 75% of your max. If you want to lose weight it will normally take a higher rate. If your goal is to increase HDL it will take 80% of your max to make that happen.

There is no cardiac benefit from exceeding 85% of your max which is why I stay under it. In addition, the more you push, the better you control your weight as well as it's also about calories burned. I try to burn 4,000 calories per week.

FYI, ex-Mainer here as well, from Cape Elizabeth. I miss those drives up the coast to your neck of the woods "down east".


Jon
976897 tn?1379171202
My Cardiologist at Imperial College said this year he will be starting a study as to why so many patients are on beta blockers. He said that it's correct to put a patient on this med when diagnosed with ischemia for example, but after intervention and a good blood flow is restored to all areas of the heart, why do you need them. He believes too many people are on this medication when it isn't necessary. I was shocked when he told me to come off mine, after being told for years they were necessary. It was quite scary. However, the extra energy you feel after just 24-48 hours is amazing.
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