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Avatar universal

pvs, svt

I have four questions:
  
1.  If a person does not have heart disease and has a structurally normal heart, is it possible for their runs of pvcs to become sustained ventricular tachycardia?

2.  If the answer is yes, what would cause this and how would one prevent it? And would this person likely survive a sustained episode because of the health of their heart?

3.  How common is it for a person with a normal heart to show infrequent runs of 3 or more pvcs?  Is their death risk increased?

4.  I have SVT and am on digoxin for it.  I have gone to the ER 3x this year for adenosine.  To aviod ER expense would taking a beta blocker at home after the SVT starts be a good and effective thing to try?  In your opinion,could it convert my SVT?  Is it safe?

Thank you for you time!
3 Responses
238668 tn?1232735930
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Dear allen,

1. If a person does not have heart disease and has a structurally normal heart, is it possible for their runs of pvcs
     to become sustained ventricular tachycardia?
A: Yes it is possible but this is the exception and not the rule.

     2. If the answer is yes, what would cause this and how would one prevent it? And would this person likely survive
     a sustained episode because of the health of their heart?
A: The usual source of a sustained VT in normal hearts is either a ventricular focus or a bundle branch reentry tachycardia. These are generally not life-threatening.

     3. How common is it for a person with a normal heart to show infrequent runs of 3 or more pvcs? Is their death
     risk increased?
A: It is fairly common and there is no increase risk of death.

     4. I have SVT and am on digoxin for it. I have gone to the ER 3x this year for adenosine. To aviod ER expense
     would taking a beta blocker at home after the SVT starts be a good and effective thing to try? In your
     opinion,could it convert my SVT? Is it safe?
A: Digoxin is an odd choice of medications for an SVT and I would first suggest getting a second opinion with a cardiologist preferably an electrophysiologist about your medical management.  It is possible that with good medical therapy you won't keep getting these episodes and if medical therapy fails it is possible your SVT could be cured with an ablation.
Avatar universal
I too suffer from runs of PVC's (6 documented in a row).  I have been through two ablations and they cannot make my heart beat weird.

I have been told no big deal to have runs of them if you have a normal heart, and I am trying really hard to believe this because I know how horrible they feel.

Avatar universal
I saw a cardiologist on Friday Dec 15 and he told me I have SVT and not mitral valve prolapse, (like I thought I did for 16 yrs!).  He suggested beta blockers, but upon further investigation of side effects (disrupted sleepin habit, fatigue, nightmares, decreased libido), I decided I'll live with palpitations, since there is no danger of heartattack, etc.
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