Aa
A
A
A
Close
Heart Disease Community
20.1k Members
Avatar universal

signs of previous catheterization

ok, this is stupid, but several years ago, i had a cardiac catheterization. very minor blockage, but i took care on my own- lost weight, better diet, etc. didnt follow up, because i was so busy with my job, home, et al. recently started having a few pains, and dr wants to do another one. different dr. didn't tell him about previous because i don't want to appear foolish. will he be able to see signs that i had one done before?
4 Responses
237039 tn?1264261657
Why would you feel foolish? What difference does it make if you have one before?  Not sure they can tell. I wouldn't think so.
976897 tn?1379171202
You may have scar tissue at the entry site. What about hospital records? unless you use a different ID, surely they would know anyway.
There is nothing to feel awkward about, it was probably the right decision at the time anyway.
Avatar universal

Of course tell your doctor...this is a second procedure on YOUR heart and the outcome might depend on it.  
63984 tn?1385441539
I'd say yes, the procedure leaves a mark.  The doctor will be concerned with your present symptoms, and you should tell the doctor about the previous test.  The first test will serve as a benchmark.  By all means, tell your doctor at once.  
Have an Answer?
Top Heart Disease Answerers
159619 tn?1538184537
Salt Lake City, UT
11548417 tn?1506084164
Netherlands
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Is a low-fat diet really that heart healthy after all? James D. Nicolantonio, PharmD, urges us to reconsider decades-long dietary guidelines.
Can depression and anxiety cause heart disease? Get the facts in this Missouri Medicine report.
Fish oil, folic acid, vitamin C. Find out if these supplements are heart-healthy or overhyped.
Learn what happens before, during and after a heart attack occurs.
What are the pros and cons of taking fish oil for heart health? Find out in this article from Missouri Medicine.
How to lower your heart attack risk.