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understand my angiocardio & Stress test help

Hello fellow heart disease and family members, I am new to this site but unfortunately not new to heart disease.  Ok, specifics..im 47 and had my first of 3 heart attacks in 2008.  The cardio cath report says i am at 15% e.f and the ECG & Stress test puts me at 25%.  I have a boston scientific pm and defib. the following I'm gonna quote from the stress test impression and findings. .
"THERE IS A LARGE AND SEVERE FIXED ANTERIOR, APICAL, INFERIOR, SEPTAL PERFUSION DEFECT CONSISTENT WITH MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN THE LAD VASCULAR TERRITORY" . and then for the findings  it says the above but with this also, "NO EVIDENCE FOR REVERSIBLE PERFUSION ABNORMALITIES AND EJECTION FRACTION IS 25%"  so that is from the ECG and 3 hr stress test etc..
now for the good part, less than a week later i went to hospital for the angio cath and to say the least, the surgeon was horrible and this was his OVERALL IMPRESSION (NOT THE SPECIFIC FINDINGS) but if the specific findings will help i can add it so here is what he says. "SEVERE DISEASE OF THE NATIVE LEFT ANTERIOR DESCENDING WITH AN OCCLUDED LEFT ANTERIOR DESCENDING STENT WITH COLLATERERALS FROM RIGHT SIDE WITH DIFFUSE DISEASE OF THE DISTAL LAD WITH SEVERE DISEASE OF THE OBTUSE MARGINAL ARTERY WITH AN FFR OF .97 DILATED VENTRICLE WITH LOW EJECTION FRACTION."
i guess I'm going to post another question separate from this regarding the mental issues and concerns that have been going on, but if anyone can explain to me the reports id appreciate it. TY
2 Responses
11548417 tn?1506080564
What the surgeon said comes down to this:

The LAD shows lots of atherosclerosis at the proximal area and also the stent that is placed earlier (you must know when) is clogged.
The left part of the heart is now supplied with blood from the right coronary artery through collaterals to the mid part of the LAD.
These collaterals are small vessels that are normally closed or even not there and that open or form when there is a  prolonged shortage of blood supply. Look at them as a sort of natural bypass.
Normally, these collaterals supply less blood to the left part of the heart than a fully functional LAD would, but can supply enough to keep you alive.

Further down the LAD there is again narrowing
The Circumflex artery starts from the mid section of the LAD and surrounds the heart from the LAD. One of its braches is called the obtuse marginal artery which, as the report says, is also suffering from blockage.

Your left ventricle (the one that really performs the main pumping action of your heart) is dilated and ejects blood less than normal.

Does this help you? Feel free to come back with more questions.


11548417 tn?1506080564
And about the stress test:

There are large areas of your heart that are fixed. This means that these areas do not contribute to the heart's pumping action.
This is due to the infarcts you had before. In these areas the heart has a lot of scar tissue and scar tissue does not contract like muscles do.
Due to this the ejection fraction (the percentage of blood in the left ventricle that is pushed out at every stroke) is 15-25% where the normal range is 55-70%.
This limits your physical ability.
Still there is no evidence found that your heart is suffering from lack of oxygen during the test.
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