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Heart Disease Community
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Avatar universal

"up to 2% of males ages 15 to 19 have severe artherosclerosis" - should i be worried?

According to the article at the bottom of my post,
up to 2% of males ages 15 to 19 have severe artherosclerosis.

Since I quit school 4 years ago I've been very inactive.
I haven't done any sports and haven't haven't hardly worked at all.

The past 5 months I haven't even left the house due to panic disorder.
I have conquered the panic disorder and am slowly becoming active again.

The problem is that during all these years that I've been inactive,
I was eating meat, cheese and a lot of chocolate every day!

Should I have a CAT-scan done of my arteries to make sure they aren't clogged?

---------------------------------
LINK TO ARTICLE:
http://www.chelationtherapyonline.com/articles/p188.htm
9 Responses
Avatar universal
Hello,
I forgot to mention that I am now 23years old and quit school at 19...
If that means anything.

I hope I can get some good advice here,
I would really appreciate it.
976897 tn?1379171202
Dont take any notice of claims made on chelation websites, this procedure doesn't even show any evidence of working. However, I do admire you for looking at your future health now and hopefully you will make the necessary adjustments.
Things to look out for are high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, exercising and avoiding long periods of stress. On top of this, eating a healthy diet is important.
So, do I think you need a CAT now?  no. I think you need to stop worrying and make the adjustments I have mentioned to give you a much higher chance of a long healthy life.
Looking over the internet can scare you to death, so I would stop looking at diseases.
Learn to CHILL :)  
367994 tn?1304957193
I don't have any favorable opinion of a magical remedy expressed in advertisements so you may not want to go there, however, autopsies of returning war casualties surprisingly showed advanced coronary artery disease in very young indivduals...doubtful the chow and lifestyle in the service is the cause :), so one may be able to reason the condition started prior to going into the service.

You may be a good candidate for the disease, but to have a cat scan to affirm you have the disease, would not help you!....you can assume you have CAD and change your eating habits, exercise, etc. as if the cat scan was positive.  
976897 tn?1379171202
"so one may be able to reason the condition started prior to going into the service"

Or the stress levels were the cause.
367994 tn?1304957193
"Or the stress levels were the cause".

Is there evidence several months of stress causes CAD?  True, stress is linked to coronary heart disease? The etiology is stress activates the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system. This leads to a constriction of the blood vessels and a rise in blood pressure and heart rate. As a result, more and more blood is pushed through shrinking arteries. LONG-TERM stress may lead to wear and tear on, and damage to, the arteries.
976897 tn?1379171202
Of course stress can cause a heart attack in months. In the UK, stress is considered a major contributor and is on the risk factor list for CAD. Our bodies are not built for handling stress. The most our ancestors had to endure with stress was running after a meal holding a spear. If you put our close ancestors, the great apes, in a stressful situation, see what happens to them within a week, let alone months.
Avatar universal
Regarding your original question ("Should I be worried...), I would say:  only if you want to be.  You can worry about it if you want to.  Some people would choose not to worry about something that has only a 2% chance of happening .  Of the 98% of young males in the study, I think most of them probably had eating habits similar to your own.  But if you need to worry about it, I'm sure you know what you're doing.
367994 tn?1304957193
I had what you are saying in mind, and I was and have been interested when CAD became a serious issue that required so much of the world's medical resources.  It is true throughout history people were expose to stress,  but serious CAD and at a younger age is a fairly recent phenomonon!
Heat attack is the number one killer!

"A review of all the cases of the coroner's court for the Liberty of Ripon and Kirkby Malzeard in Yorkshire from 1855 to 1926, and those of 1981-83, showed that the number of deaths from acute coronary artery disease was very low in Victorian times, suddenly increased in the period 1906-10, and was very high in 1981-83. The population of the area was stable throughout the period at around 22 000. The number of postmortems for myocardial infarctions carried out in London hospitals was very low between 1907 and 1914, but greatly increased between 1917 and 1923. A study of autopsies in the City of London showed that the increase in the number of deaths from coronary artery disease began in 1909/10".  Was stress less prevalent during periods of fewer Mi's?

Why do some populations have fewer heart issues, etc.?  Stress is a factor for some populations, but it didn't appear to be a problem for the caveman, etc.!  
Avatar universal
"A study of autopsies in the City of London showed that the increase in the number of deaths from coronary artery disease began in 1909/10".  

Maybe that's when people started living long enough to die from CAD and other degenerative diseases, as opposed to infections and trauma.  
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