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Avatar universal

Copoing with pvc's and pac's

Does anybody besides me sometimes have trouble coping with their arrhythmias?  I have noticed a change in my living patterns since these things started acting up again.  I have a hard time taking trips out of town thinking what will i do if they act up when i  am out of town.  Also going to work is another problem when they start to act up. They give  me anxiety or anxiety gives em to me and i was just wondering if anyone could share their coping skills with me. I really want to get back into my normal life. Or maybe this is gonna be my normal life from now on. Please if you know any good coping skills let me know.  I'm on inderal and verapamil for the flips etc and xanax for the anxiety. I know most of my triggers and try to avoid what triggers em but am willing to try anything to make life more fun again.
6 Responses
177337 tn?1310059899
Hi~
I think you hit the nail on the head when you stated "is this my normal life now".
I deal with the same issues you do.  I make myself go places sometimes but it is never the same as before my first pvc.  I really hate flying.  I don't do it very often and I won't do it alone.   So sorry, I guess I don't have any coping skills except for the fact that I don't sit home afraid.  I do go out and I do travel.  It just isn't quite the same anymore.  Unless I am in Vegas!  Those slot machines make me forget and I love it.  lol

Unfortunately what can trigger one today, won't be the thing that triggers one tomorrow.  
Today I had to go to the dentist.  I didn't have one problem.  Tomorrow I may just get up to wash my hair and wham they start up.
The only thing I know for sure is that stress and anxiety will make them worse.  
So yes, this is my normal life now.

Frenchie

267401 tn?1251852496
It looks like you've had PVC's for about 24 years.  I've only had them for 10 or so, but I can understand what you mean - you get on a stretch where they last for a few weeks or a few months and you begin to wonder if that's how it's always going to be.

Thankfully I've had enough similar periods in the previous 10 years that I know it doesn't have to be and likely won't be the way I'll have to live for the rest of my life.  At some point I'll start having less and then one day I'll just notice they aren't there anymore.

Stress is a sneaky one for me, because the kind of stress that triggers them for me is not immediate fight-or-flight stress.  It's more of a slow burn kind of stress that builds incrementally over time.  This also makes it hard to change the pattern that caused them because I'm never exactly sure how I got to where I am in the first place.

But having defeated them enough times, I know the usual suspects and can often shut them down relatively quickly now.  I hope you have some of that same knowledge.

But don't stop living.  Let me give you the super-scary, nightmare end game.  (Some may want to avoid reading this)  If the million-to-one odds come true and a PVC sets off VF, unless there's a cardiologist with a defibrillator in the room, there isn't going to be much anyone will be able to do.  Even if you're at home.  And the way you'll go?  You'll feel light-headed, then you'll pass out.  And that will be it.  

As far as exit strategies go, that's not a bad way to depart.  

No matter how you leave this earth, car crash, cancer, heart problem, it most likely will not be the day and time of your choosing.  So stopping your life because "today might be the day" seems silly, when you really think about it.  If you knew today was the day, wouldn't you want to skydive or streak through the center of town or some other crazy thing?  Of all the things you can think of doing, sitting at home in a comfortable chair, wrapped in a blanket doesn't seem like the best choice.

You didn't choose to be a PVC warrior.  The role was given to you.  And you can have a thousand reasons, all good ones, for why you can't continue to live life normally with your PVC's.  But in the end, you'll either have lived a full, exciting life in spite of them, or a fearful, sheltered life because of them.

The best part is, you get to choose which road you take.
363281 tn?1590104173
Outstanding post Wisconsin. You really have some good points.
As to how I cope, well, at times, it is very difficult for me. I am blessed in the fact that I do not have as many as some, but, even one can scare me, and then, my whole dog-gone day is ruined. Ugh, I must get over that, it is ruining the quality of my life. I know that for me, stress, anxiety or even excitement, good or bad can cause them, usually. Then again, some times nothing causes them. I am not consistent and I do not think many folks are. I do know that I am more afraid to go out in public alone than I used to be, and travel does not hold the charm it used to either. I am supposed to go to the dentist soon, and I am dreading that. I have had mine off and on since my mid 20's. They got worse in 2004, went away again for a few months, then, after my mother died, they really came back. I have been considering school, but for now, it is on hold until Fall, main reason being the school I have picked does not start the classes until then. I am sort of excited, and I feel that once I start, it will be fine. The neat part is, it is not too far from home and I am very familiar with the community as I lived there for over 20 years.
There are some great books on the market for stress and anxiety, my favorite is called "Hope and Help for Your nerves" by Claire Weekes, I would highly recommend it to anyone suffering from anxiety. She covers the heart palps and so many other things and it is written in every day language.
Hope this has helped. Keep us posted. We are here for you.
Avatar universal
Here is my two cents!!  I really believe in the slow build stress theory mentioned above.  I suffer from some kind of generalized anxiety disorder.  I have tried Lexapro for years which are taken daily.  Also Xanax for emergency only.  I stopped the Lexapro last summer (tough withdraw btw).  Within weeks I was back in depression worse than ever.  I could not sleep and was often sick.  The runs of PAC's started.  By December, I have had enough and got back on the Lexapro.  It took a few weeks, but I am now sleeping well and the PAC's are down to just a couple a day.  I feel a lot better overall.  I guess the recommendation I have is if you believe the issue is stress, don't use Xanax as a "fire extinguisher" alone.  Get after the real problem.  Get help.  Don't tough it out, you would be amazed how common this is.  
98523 tn?1322074646
you just told my life are you my doppelganger (LOL)   I detest this pvs pacs whatever the jump in your chest and your trying to count your pause by holding your wrist because taking your pulse in your neck is way to obvious!  I have quit every job I have started after a month or so because of the panic the pvc's bring on to me Luckily I have a husband who doesn't want me to work anyway, but the problem is I do ! I wanna work I wanna travel and not be a nervous wreck the whole time ,wishing I was back home hiding my fear as not to ruin everyone Else's fun. I want to be a strong independent woman but only anger gets me fired up to change then it where's off and then  I'm back at home under the masters thumb .damn I hate that! I want to be a moviestar a actress or at least try but I am in hell with worry about my heart.I noticed most of us me included live healthy lives exercise daily and eat well and take any vitamin we ever heard off that helps with skipped beats, and structurally are hearts are normal because we've had every test under the sun....So I guess I am just nuts i dunno but it has ruined my life dreams and goals (self destruction?) btw I started having them when I had a ovary removed and 1/2 of the other removed because of a cyst and no insurance had to wait until it wrapped around my appendix which is gone and some of my bowl about a month later I had My first 1skipped beat  coincedience you   be the judge That was 21 years ago and they come and go and I have really bad days and some days none .I hold on fo rhte good days!
363281 tn?1590104173
Boy, your post sure sounds like me. I am a slave to these things, and they keep me in prison daily. I never exercise like I should because I am afraid I will have them while doing the walk, and many times I have and I have been so scared I almost pass out. I can not work, can't go back to school, NOTHING!! I want to be normal again too, and I pray about it all the time. I do NOT want to be like this. Oh, how I yearn to be like I used to be. I may have had them before, but, they did not bother me, now, every little beat gets to me, I do not know why. I want to be normal so badly and stop worrying. :(

I have had the echocardiogram, it was OK and this past week, the 24 Holtor, I should get those results this week. I take the best food-grade vitamins and minerals, you name it, I have done it or am still doing it.

I know mine are worse with stress and anxiety, and right now I am very keyed up. They are also worse during fluctuation in my hormones. I have had ovarian cysts, but, they to have dissolved, I know I am prone to them.

Like you, I hold to the few good days I have and really try to enjoy them. And, if you are nuts, then so am I. I think lots of are "nuts" then, it is only natural to be worried, maybe not as much as I am, but, I wager lots of folks are and they are embarrassed to admit it.

Hugs to all and I pray we will cope better with these heart beats from Hades.
Susie
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