Aa
A
A
A
Close
Heart Rhythm Community
12.2k Members
16361457 tn?1449652821

Heart rythm disorder?

Hello. I am 20 years old and am from Lithuania. I have been having long periods of increased pulse and difficulty breathing for 6 months now. I also feel weird pressure in my head and have periods of memory loss when I forget what was I just saying or what I just heard. It gets worst before going to sleep and about 4am when I wake up from very fast pulse (160) and I am in panic for about one hour after that, I am able to sleep again. I feel hopeless every time it happens and think I will never feel healthy again. I can't do any exercise because my heart starts jumping. I waited for 3 months for cardiologist appointment and she tested me with Holter monitor. Today when she examined results, she refered me to 3rd level cardiologist. She said she sees arrythmia in the results and I think, if I heard right, periods of heart stopping??
Does anyone know what tests or diagnosis can I expect? The doctor did not tell me anyting and now I have to wait for other appointment for a month. I'm finding very worrying information online about tests where a needle needs to be inserted in the heart, for example, or illnesses like heart failure, which is very stressul. When I remember all this when my pulse is 160, I get petrified and think(and feel) my heart is going to stop. I called an ambulance for a few times but all they see is increased pulse and give me sedatives.
ps.: my family doctor prescribed me bromazepam few months ago when I didn't know I have some rythm disorder. Is it safe for me to take them?
2 Responses
1807132 tn?1318743597
You are not at a point of needing any sort of needle put in your heart.  I suspect you read about an ablation and that is where the needle worry comes from.  Regardless your rate is a bit low for it to be a type of arrhythmia issue that can be treated with ablation.  Do you know when you get it does it start and stop in what feels like one beat or does it ramp up and slow down at a slower rate?  Shortness of breath is pretty common for fast heart rates but most of them in an otherwise healthy heart are nothing to worry about.  The tests they give you would maybe be an echo, a stress test, or a cardiac mri all of which do not involve needles.  The odds of this leading the heart failure are also low since this comes and goes.  Issues that could be contributing could be thyroid issues.  Have you been tested for them?  Dehydration can also cause tachycardia so make sure you are drinking enough water.  As well this may be anxiety related if you are prone to worry and panicking.  A this point I would avoid speculating too much about what is going on and wait for the doctor to check your heart out.  I suspect that whatever is going on needs to be addressed but isn't a major life threat so try to relax and not worry.  That will only make you have more symptoms.  Take care and let us know what the next doctor says.    
16361457 tn?1449652821
Thank you for a comment. My doctor also said I have low potassium and magnesium levels. It is probably due to harsh dieting in the past I now regret so much. I started to take supplements and I think my heart feels normal again most of the time except from chest pressure and weird feeling of despair and depression when I wake up 5am everyday. It lasts for one hour and then I am back to sleep. I also have insomnia, but I hope everything will go away when I take more supplements. I still need to go to another doctor though
Have an Answer?
Top Arrhythmias Answerers
1807132 tn?1318743597
Chicago, IL
1423357 tn?1511085442
Central, MA
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Are there grounds to recommend coffee consumption? Recent studies perk interest.
Salt in food can hurt your heart.
Get answers to your top questions about this common — but scary — symptom
How to know when chest pain may be a sign of something else
For people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), the COVID-19 pandemic can be particularly challenging.
A list of national and international resources and hotlines to help connect you to needed health and medical services.