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19745875 tn?1483638911

PVC's anxiety and medication

I've had PVCs for 12 years (started after hormonal birth control) long story short, I have major cardiophobia and anxiety over them so much so that it interferes with my life. I'm doing CBT therapy, I take an ativan rarely but I'm still sort of stuck. My therapist had recommended thinking about an SSRI or something to ease my anxiety. I'm very hesitant about this as I tend to have the mindset of "what doesn't kill you has a cure that will" however, I'm not sure how much longer I want to be in this state of mind if there's something that could help me.

So, my question is this. Have any of you tried such a medication with PVC's? I know they can funk with your heart rhythm and that's the root of my anxiety so i'm curious if this has worked for anyone.
2 Responses
Avatar universal
I have had much the same experience, but for a longer period--panic disorder accompanied by PVCs--and I can tell you that for me, SSRIs have been the *absolute* answer to the problem.  

I have a shrink, and I always recommend a psychiatrist to treat this kind of thing, because these people are MDs with a special knowledge of the biochemistry of drugs and their effects on both the mind and body.  It is highly specialized experience, and for this reason, I would not suggest going to a general practitioner.

In my case, my shrink tried me on four (or maybe five?) SSRIs before finding the perfect one, which, for me was Zoloft.  This was a time-consuming process, because you generally need at least six weeks to see the true effect of these meds, and while waiting for that, you might need something like a certain dose of ativan to get over the hump, so to speak.

Also, the doctor should be in close contact with you to keep an eye out for side effects or the need for dosage adjustment.

The result for me was that gradually I became less aware of the ectopic beats, and as that experience grew longer, the ectopics *decreased* in number.  This is actually kind of predictable, since a state of anxiety increases the irritable tendency of the heart cells responsible for the ectopics.

I'd suggest giving a number of SSRIs a serious trial.  You may find, as I did, that you get your life back.
Avatar universal
I have had much the same experience, but for a longer period--panic disorder accompanied by PVCs--and I can tell you that for me, SSRIs have been the *absolute* answer to the problem.  

I have a shrink, and I always recommend a psychiatrist to treat this kind of thing, because these people are MDs with a special knowledge of the biochemistry of drugs and their effects on both the mind and body.  It is highly specialized experience, and for this reason, I would not suggest going to a general practitioner.

In my case, my shrink tried me on four (or maybe five?) SSRIs before finding the perfect one, which, for me was Zoloft.  This was a time-consuming process, because you generally need at least six weeks to see the true effect of these meds, and while waiting for that, you might need something like a certain dose of ativan to get over the hump, so to speak.

Also, the doctor should be in close contact with you to keep an eye out for side effects or the need for dosage adjustment.

The result for me was that gradually I became less aware of the ectopic beats, and as that experience grew longer, the ectopics *decreased* in number.  This is actually kind of predictable, since a state of anxiety increases the irritable tendency of the heart cells responsible for the ectopics.

I'd suggest giving a number of SSRIs a serious trial.  You may find, as I did, that you get your life back.
2 Comments
Ooops, duplicate post!  Sorry about that.
Thank you for taking the time to explain your situation with medication. I will most definitely consider it if this persists. I'm glad you were able to find some relief. Like I said, I worry about exacerbating my palpitations or introducing an unwanted side effect. Hopefully I'm able to resolve this but I'm hopeful hearing that if I'm not able, that there are people who have found it helpful. Definitely would switch to a psychiatrist should I decide to go that route.
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