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SVT

In July my cardiologist said I have early signs of sick sinus syndrome. I have a low resting heart rate of 50, drops to mid to high 30's at times during night, otherwise in 40's during night. In October I had an event monitor for a month. Dr. said it shows I have SVT/AFIB and prescribed Propafanone.  After reviewing this drug and all the other similar ones, I decided not to take it. I'm taking 325 mg of aspirin a day.  I am scared to death of having a stroke but everything I've read says these drugs can make arrhythmias worse. Besides these drugs say they lower your heart rate and BP.. Both of mine are already low. I don't know if I should seek another cardiologist. Does anyone have the same situation as far as SVT/AFIB..  Any suggestions?  THANK YOU!
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Avatar universal
Never trust a cardiologist's recommendations, unless you have thoroughly researched everything he has prescribed. In your case, I too would be hesitant to take this drug. I would get a second opinion from another doctor, and specifically ask why you should take a drug that professes to increase the symptoms that you already have.
Helpful - 0
995271 tn?1463924259
Any signs of afib = need to be on blood thinners until you fix the afib.  
Helpful - 0
12492606 tn?1459874033
Because you are asymptomatic during AF episodes, the most important thing to do is anticoagulation medicine for stroke prevention.  So I am surprised that your cardiologist didn't prescribe that for you and wants you on an AAD (anti-arrhythmic drug) instead.  And I agree that with your low heart rate, it may not be a good thing.  The specialist to see would be an electrophysiologist because they would have more expertize in AAD and anti-coagulants.  Because you are asymptomatic, you probably don't need ablation.  The newest anticoagulants are relatively hassle free unlike warfarin.  As for the aspirin, that is a good idea until you get on an anticoagulant.  All you need is 80 mg per day, anything over that doesn't help more and bleeding risk is increased with high dosage.

Once you get your EP consultation, then he can work with your cardiologist to maintain medications.  If you have complications from anticoagulation, then you would have the option of an ablation in which case you have to find an EP that is experienced in ablations.

My father in law has lived with asymptomatic AF for 27 years now.  Warfarin is all he takes and also statin for cholesterol.  He has done well although he has had nose bleeds that required rare ER visits.
Helpful - 0
12492606 tn?1459874033
Because you are asymptomatic during AF episodes, the most important thing to do is anticoagulation medicine for stroke prevention.  So I am surprised that your cardiologist didn't prescribe that for you and wants you on an AAD (anti-arrhythmic drug) instead.  And I agree that with your low heart rate, it may not be a good thing.  The specialist to see would be an electrophysiologist because they would have more expertize in AAD and anti-coagulants.  Because you are asymptomatic, you probably don't need ablation.  The newest anticoagulants are relatively hassle free unlike warfarin.  As for the aspirin, that is a good idea until you get on an anticoagulant.  All you need is 80 mg per day, anything over that doesn't help more and bleeding risk is increased with high dosage.

Once you get your EP consultation, then he can work with your cardiologist to maintain medications.  If you have complications from anticoagulation, then you would have the option of an ablation in which case you have to find an EP that is experienced in ablations.

My father in law has lived with asymptomatic AF for 27 years now.  Warfarin is all he takes and also statin for cholesterol.  He has done well although he has had nose bleeds that required rare ER visits.
Helpful - 0
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