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Avatar universal

What kind of heart condition do I have?

Hello all. I am a young adult female, 25 yrs old. Growing up I always had occasional PVCs as do most people and low BP with pre syncope upon standing up quickly or riding rollercoasters as a teenager which I feel like is almost normal. I have a history of anxiety and panic attacks. I went on antidepressant  a few years ago and last year out of the blue I developed PVCs anytime my HR would go up such as when I was walking up the stairs or going up a hill or any walking or exercise . Had an exercise test which showed isolated PVCs during and after stress test with a normal echo. My PVCs get really bad anytime my HR would go up and I would sometimes get nonsustained v tach. My doctor doesn’t seemed concerned at all. I have read that PVCs that increase with exercise are indicative of a heart condition. No one in my family has died of sudden cardiac arrest at a young age. My mother has PVCs as well as does most women in my family. Both grandfathers had CAD with bypass surgery and were frequent smokers and alcohol drinkers. My question is what is causing these sudden PVCs with increased HR? I now take beta blockers because I can’t handle the PVCs it interferes too much with my life. Should I see another doctor and push for further testing? I need to get surgery next month and I am so scared of dying under general anesthesia. I now am having panic attacks and avoid things like stairs because of the dreaded PVCs I will get when going up them. The only thing I could think of is that I gained a lot of weight and became out of shape. Any ideas? Should I see a different cardiologist? What are my chances of dying from PVCs during exertion?
3 Responses
Avatar universal
I have PVCs too and they scare me so much. I'm so scared I'm going to get NSVT or Vtach even though I don't think I've ever had it. I've had 3 kids and got an epidural with each and was even having pvcs while they set it up and I had no problems. Trust me the anesthesiologist will be watching for anything he thinks is abnormal. Everyone has pvcs so he probably won't think anything of it, especially since your doctors aren't concernced. When you have your NSVT, what does your pulse feel like?
1423357 tn?1511085442
".....I would sometimes get nonsustained v tach."

Has this been recorded and reviewed by a professional?  If not, what makes you think it's NSVT?
1 Comments
It was caught on a holter monitor while I was exercising
Avatar universal
Hey, try not to worry! I used to get sustained VT during exercise, I was diagnosed with a benign condition called RVOTVT, had an ablation in August. Now I have no more VT, but I get approx 1500 PVCs a day, and more during and after exercise. They're annoying, but I've decided to avoid meds as beta blockers made mine worse and I don't want to be on meds my whole life so I just live with it.

If you've been to the docs and they're not concerned, then you shouldn't be either :) you're not going to drop dead, and you'll be absolutely fine with your surgery, as someone else has said you're in the best place in the best hands no matter what happens.

I know it's hard to get your head around, but try as best as you can to force yourself to relax when you feel them, try not to let them worry you as this can just make them more noticeable. I find mine are more noticeable when I am relaxing or sitting at work, so I try and distract myself when I get them.
1 Comments
My doctor doesn’t want to do an ablation for some reason. My beta blocker is helping a lot it has reduced the PVCs and v tach but they make me tired and I’m losing a lot of hair.
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