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Avatar universal

Abnormal LFTs after Interferon Therapy

Dear Sir/Madam,

I had interferon therapy 1 years ago and achieved RvR.

Few days back, I got my Real Time PCR HCV(QN) with 354130 - IU/ml.

MY HCV Gentotype is '3a'

Can anyone guide me what should I do? If I go for interferon therapy again, Dr says I've to go for therapy for 12 months and only 50% chances are I'll get recovered. And if not, my liver will get worst.

I got married about a year ago and trying to have baby. Please someone help me..

My LFTs are:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TEST(s)                               UNIT(s)    NORMAL    RESULT
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TOTAL BILIRUBIN                 mg/dL      Up to 1.0    1.05
DIRECT BILIRUBIN                mg/dL     0 - 0.4         0.2
INDIRECT BILIRUBIN             mg/dL     < 0.7           0.85
ALT                                       U/L        10 - 50        76
AST                                      U/L         10 - 50        77
ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE   U/L         40 - 129      92
GGT                                     U/L         8 - 61          136
TOTAL PROTEIN                   g/dL       5.5 - 8.0       7.93
ALBUMIN                              g/dL       3.5 - 5.5       4.48
GLOBULIN                            g/dL       2.0 - 3.5       3.45
A/G RATIO                                                            1.3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Best Regards,
QZ
11 Responses
148588 tn?1465782409
If I were in your place I would hold off on treatment and try to get a liver biopsy to assess the degree of fibrosis and steatosis in your liver. You should not have any treatment drugs in your system  --  especially ribavirin  --  for at least six months before you try to concieve.
I carried a geno 3 virus for almost 30 years with viral load and ALT/AST very similar to yours and had only minor fibrosis  --  but that's just one person. Others progress faster. Get the biopsy and find out whether you have time to wait on treatment.
Avatar universal
To the best of my knowledge since you last treated there has been no major advance in treating geno 3.  I would not expect a dramatically different outcome if I did the same treatment.

There are several new treatments coming for geno 3's.   Might you be able to wait a year or two?
Have you had a biopsy/what is your staging/can you wait would weigh into factors on deciding what to do.

In 5 years perhaps there could be MANY better treatments and it is also possible that prices could come down due to competition.  New treatments should have increases in safety, a shortening of the TX duration and reduced side effects during and post TX.

If money is less of an object the newest/ best I am aware of will be a Gilead treatment which will be interferon free for g-3's, should be a shorter treatment.  This may be approved in the United States in 3-4 months.... we will see...... If you are from another country I cannot speculate on that time table.

willy
1840891 tn?1431551393
I'm so sorry to hear the HCV is back again. It's not clear to me whether this is a relapse or a new infection, as you only mentioned achieving RVR (rapid viral response, which means the virus dropped quickly when you started the drugs), but you did not mention SVR. (Sustained viral response, meaning the virus remained undetectable for a full 24 weeks after your treatment ended). Did you actually achieve SVR, or did you at least remain UND throughout your previous tx? A more detailed history of your previous tx would be helpful. Have you had a liver biopsy in the last few years? It is true that new drugs are currently being developed which will make treatment both easier and more effective, but this must be carefully balanced against the current degree of liver damage and the likelihood of further damage occurring while waiting. You must also keep in mind the fact that you absolutely should not try to father a child while taking ribavirin OR for six months after taking it. When to treat is a complicated decision and everything needs to be taken into account and the answer is not the same for every person. I'm also not that familiar with your genotype, so I'm hoping someone else  with more knowledge of genotype 3 will chime in soon. Good luck!
Avatar universal
Thank you all for your support and help.. I appreciate your time and the care..

A friend of mine suggested me to go for Homepathic treatment. He says your virus may not be cleaned out completely but viral load will become low i.e., at a minimum possible level and your LFTs will become normal.

Is this possible?

Thanks again for your time and all the care..
-QZ
1840891 tn?1431551393
It is generally accepted that the degree of liver damage you are accumulating is not well correlated with either viral load or lft numbers, so its hard to say if treatments that lowered those numbers would be helpful as a temporary measure (if there even are homeopathic remedies that can lower those numbers, which I don't know). At any rate, you cannot be cured by those means, and getting completely rid of the virus is the only sure way to stop it from continuing to damage your liver. Again, a lot depends on your current liver condition (fibrosis stage as indicated by a biopsy or a fibroscan), which would tell us how urgent it is to treat the virus now versus waiting for the next generation of meds, and on the odds of successfully treating the virus with existing meds. If we knew more about your previous treatment (how long did you treat, what your viral load was pre-tx and what it was at all the tested points during and immediately after tx), then someone could probably pull up some studies that would give your odds of successfully treating it now.

If you have minimal liver damage (either 0 or 1 on the fibrosis staging), then you can probably afford to wait for the next meds, IF you take very good care of your liver in the meantime. That means no alcohol consumption at all, using great caution with all meds and dietary supplements, including avoiding all NSAIDs, eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise. Don't take any medicines or supplements without checking with your liver doctor on whether they are safe for your liver condition. Some "natural" cures may help reduce inflammation in the liver, but some can be deadly. Natural does not necessarily mean safe.
766573 tn?1365170066
The thing is no offense but it sounds as if your friend does not understand
Hepatitis C and the terminology.

The viral load does not reflect the amount of damage to
your liver.  This is why a biopsy is a good idea. It shows

how far your fibrosis has progressed. An acquaintance of mine has
a low viral load and she is stage 3 fibrosis. Her liver enzymes are only

slightly elevated.

The VA web site says in some cases a low viral load might mean it is easier to clear the virus but mostly a viral load only matters when you
are treating. It shows how you are responding to the meds.

AlSo did you reach SVR or were you only RVR?

Hepat
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