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13100769 tn?1445372717

Anyone treating with Ribavirin/Sovaldi?

Hi.  I'm a Gt3 and while I'm excited to be on treatment, I also feel slighted almost that I can't take Harvoni.   I'm always searching for results from others with the same as me but I don't see much.  I have 8 more weeks to go from a 24 week treatment of Ribavirin and Sovaldi.   I'm praying for the best but could use some support.  Thank you for reading.  
15 Responses
7469840 tn?1409849436
Hang in there! I was a Gt4 and successfully treated with same tx as you last year for 12 weeks. I know there are others on this forum who were cured on the same tx you are on. I know the feeling you are having, I couldn't  have taken Harvoni either. These are truly miracle drugs!
Avatar universal
Hi there,
I saw your post and wanted to let you know that you are not alone!  Regardless of genotype, liver status, SVR status and treatment protocol, we are all in this together.  I'm a genotype 1A and just finished 24 weeks of Harvoni and Ribavirin.  
It was my 4th treatment and I'm hoping my final!

The 2nd time I treated I did Victrelis, RIBA, and Interferon and was suppose to go 48 weeks.  I was sicker than a dog and wasn't clear at 26 weeks. I had to stop.  It felt like everyone around me was clearing and I felt alone.  People here were supportive and helped me realize I wasn't alone and wouldn't be.  
The 3rd time I did Sovaldi/RIBA/Interferon for 12 weeks.  Most everyone with the exception of a few of us were on The interferon free regime.  We all supported each other.  Again, treatment didn't work for a few of us and we helped each other through.

Hang in there and focus on the treatment that has been prescribed for you.  We are all here to support each other regardless of treatment protocol, liver status, genotype, etc.  we all want the same outcome...freedom from the dragon!  
Be well!
Avatar universal
Super and wish the best for you to achieve SVR. Sorry I don't have more real world treatment results but can provide this information to you and others interested in GT 3 treatment Guidance updates

I read through your prior posts so if I'm correct you are treatment-naive without cirrhosis.  If so the odds are pretty high for SVR around low 90's% in trials real world maybe mid 80's my non medical guess

In the most recent guidelines that treatment is still a recommended Alternative regimen if that is your situation.

For those who are Treatment Experience Genotype 3, that treatment is no longer recommended.

FYI to all
http://www.hcvguidelines.org/news
Accessed September 2, 2015

FYI This is a link I use now to quickly check if there are new updates. - bookmark link.  The updated sections have direct links to the updated pages.  Plus the updated text is highlighted in Yellow for at least 30 days after the date of the update.

Previous two recent updates shown as of my access date.

New Guidance Section
Thursday, August 20, 2015
The following new section of the HCV Guidance has been released, Overview of Cost, Reimbursement, and Cost-Effectiveness Considerations for Hepatitis C Treatment Regimens."  

"Guidance Sections Updated
Friday, August 7, 2015
The Initial, Retreatment, Monitoring, and Unique Populations (HIV/HCV Coinfection, Decompensated Cirrhosis, Post-Liver Transplantation, and Renal Impairment) sections have been revised based on newly available therapies and data."

For Your specific situation click the appropriate link on the news page in "Guidance Sections Updated  Friday, August 7, 2015
______________________________________
Initial (from this link scroll down to )
treatment box for GT3

Recommended regimens for treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 3 infection.
Daily daclatasvir (60 mg*) and sofosbuvir (400 mg) for 12 weeks (no cirrhosis) or 24 weeks with or without weight-based RBV (cirrhosis) is recommended for treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 3 infection.
Rating: Class I, Level A (no cirrhosis); Class IIa, Level C (cirrhosis)

Daily sofosbuvir (400 mg) and weight-based RBV plus weekly PEG-IFN for 12 weeks is recommended for IFN-eligible, treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 3 infection.
Rating: Class I, Level A

*The dose of daclatasvir may need to increase or decrease when used concomitantly with cytochrome P450 3A/4 inducers and inhibitors, respectively. Please refer to the prescribing information and the section on HIV/HCV coinfection for patients on antiretoviral therapy.
____________________________________

Alternative regimen for treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 3 infection.
Daily sofosbuvir (400 mg) and weight-based RBV for 24 weeks is an alternative regimen for treatment-naive patients with HCV genotype 3 infection who are IFN-ineligible.
Rating: Class I, Level A

Retreatment link
Treatment Experience Genotype 3

without cirrhosis
Recommended regimens for patients with HCV genotype 3 infection without cirrhosis, in whom prior treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV has failed.
Daily daclatasvir (60 mg) and sofosbuvir (400 mg) for 12 weeks is recommended for patients with HCV genotype 3 infection without cirrhosis, in whom prior treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV has failed.
Rating: Class I, Level A

with cirrhosis
Daily sofosbuvir (400 mg) and weight-based RBV plus weekly PEG-IFN for 12 weeks is recommended for IFN-eligible patients without cirrhosis with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV has failed.
Rating: Class I Level A

Recommended regimens for patients with HCV genotype 3 infection with cirrhosis, in whom prior treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV has failed.
Daily daclatasvir (60 mg) and sofosbuvir (400 mg) for 24 weeks with weight based RBV is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV has failed and who are IFN ineligible.
Rating: Class IIa, Level C

Daily sofosbuvir (400 mg) and weight-based RBV plus weekly PEG-IFN for 12 weeks is recommended for patients with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with PEG-IFN and RBV has failed and who are IFN eligible.
Rating: Class I, Level A
___________________________________

Recommended regimens for patients with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with sofosbuvir and RBV has failed.
Daily daclatasvir (60 mg) and sofosbuvir (400 mg) for 24 weeks with weight-based RBV is recommended for IFN-ineligible patients with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with sofosbuvir and RBV has failed.
Rating: Class IIa Level C
--
Daily sofosbuvir (400 mg) and weight-based RBV plus weekly PEG-IFN for 12 weeks is recommended for IFN-eligible patients with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with sofosbuvir and RBV has failed.
Rating: Class IIa Level C
_____________________________________

Recommended regimens for patients with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with sofosbuvir and RBV has failed.
Daily daclatasvir (60 mg) and sofosbuvir (400 mg) for 24 weeks with weight-based RBV is recommended for IFN-ineligible patients with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with sofosbuvir and RBV has failed.
Rating: Class IIa Level C

Daily sofosbuvir (400 mg) and weight-based RBV plus weekly PEG-IFN for 12 weeks is recommended for IFN-eligible patients with HCV genotype 3 infection, in whom prior treatment with sofosbuvir and RBV has failed.
Rating: Class IIa Level C

Note I only listed box info but strongly recommend reading the more detailed text which includes some of the reasoning.

See these sections if they apply Monitoring, and Unique Populations (HIV/HCV Coinfection, Decompensated Cirrhosis, Post-Liver Transplantation, and Renal Impairment)

A reminder this notice is posted on the main page.
NOTICE: Guidance for hepatitis C treatment in adults is changing constantly with the advent of new therapies and other developments. A static version of this guidance, such as printouts of this website material, booklets, slides, and other materials, may be outdated by the time you read this. We urge you to review this guidance on this website (www.hcvguidelines.org) for the latest recommendations.

One more strong suggestion for anyone posting or replying in the forums about these HCV guidelines is to
****Provide a link and the date you actually last accessed the guidelines.
This at least lets everyone reading know that the poster check for any updates before posting.  

It's possible anyone of us could still make an error so if you are using these guidelines for treatment consideration please double check and then discuss with your medical professional any questions or concerns..

.The only reason I may see for not including a link with access date is replying to a post on the same day that already includes that information. God forbid if someone used outdated information and it a negative effect on them or someone else.

I'm asking everyone "pretty please" try to take that little extra time to do so.
Avatar universal
Found this
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4523924/

Early virological response may predict treatment response in sofosbuvir-based combination therapy of chronic hepatitis c in a multi-center “real-life” cohort

"Methods
We analyzed a cohort of 119 patients with chronic HCV infection treated at four investigational sites in Germany. All patients received either a combination treatment of SOF, RBV and peg-IFN-alfa-2a or SOF and RBV."
Methods

"We analyzed a cohort of 119 patients with chronic HCV infection treated at four investigational sites in Germany. All patients received either a combination treatment of SOF, RBV and peg-IFN-alfa-2a or SOF and RBV".

excerpts listed below only include GT3 SVR rates NOTE:only 22 patients is very limited.see full article for other GT and Early virological response may predict treatment response info.

"among 24 patients with genotype 3 infection the SVR 12 rate was 92 % (n = 22)

Furthermore, in genotype 3 infected HCV patients, which have previously emerged as a particularly difficult to treat patient group, total SVR 12 rates in our study turned out to be higher than projected.
The VALENCE trial yielded for previously treated and untreated patients with HCV genotype 3 infection total SVR 12 rates of 77–93 % after a 24-week regime of SOF and RBV, while the subgroup of previously treated cirrhotic patients displayed only SVR 12 rates of 61 % [9, 14, 16, 19]. With the addition of peg-IFN-alfa-2a to 12 weeks of SOF plus RBV in the LONESTAR-2 trial SVR 12 rates of 83 % were achieved in this unfavorable subgroup of previously treated cirrhotics [20].

It can be speculated that these positive results may reflect a selection of patients with early stage cirrhosis with only minimally lowered thrombocyte counts, which were therefore regarded to be eligible to receive IFN.

The patients in our collective showed total SVR 12 rates of 92 % and even treatment-experienced cirrhotics showed a SVR 12 rate of 87 % despite an interferon-free treatment regime in most of the cases. Eventually these data suggest that besides SOF plus RBV for 24 weeks, a SOF plus RBV and IFN treatment for 12 weeks should still be considered for IFN-eligible genotype 3 patients."
Avatar universal
Jaz:  I WAS also Gt 3 and treated with the Sol/RIBA for 24 weeks.  To help the melds don't their best job, I ate a liver friendly diet, drank purified water 99% of the time, ate a small amount of 'good' fat just before time to take meds (twice a day), and, of course, prayed.

I am one of those success stories.  I am SVR 9+ months after completing tx.  Hang in there.  My Dr said that the rates of success with this combo for Gt3s was like 65 to 85% but felt I needed to be on the meds so that my Fibrosis (F3) did not progress to Cirrhosis before Gt3 meds were out.  He ALSO said, 'But if you are one of the 65 - 85 %, then the cure is 100%.  I thought that was a good way of putting it, and of encouraging total commitment to the to.

Jimmy:  I am not disputing your percentages or quotes on SVR rates on Sol/RIBA, just quoting what my Dr said to me.

Jaz, do everything you can to help the meds work, But, if they don't, don't despair.  They will have protected your liver while you were on txt AND Daklinza is now out and can be combined with Sovaldi for a much higher chance of success!

Blessings, and on to SVR (the first time)!

Pat
Avatar universal
My only personal opinion (real world guess) was for GT3 SVR rates was mid 80's for SOV/RBV 24 weeks for those who were treatment naive and without cirrhosis.  Without further details the range 65 to 85% SVR includes both treatment experienced and naive with cirrhosis and without cirrhosis.
The 85% high end would be about the same as my mid 80's. The low end of 65% or even 60% would apply to tx exper and or cirrhosis.  

I can't see any significant differences.

Any links and SVR rates quoted from sources can only be evaluated based on their credibility.

Another personal guess is that SVR rates May be defined differently by insurance companies and medical providers.  Some may include persons who didn't take the drugs properly, lost to follow-up, died,  and other reasons.  So anyone who is serious about taking all meds and following health suggestions will on average have a higher SVR rate than a large sample of real world rates.  

Purely theoretical example.
Trial SVR rate large sample 84%. Real world SVR
70%. large sample.  Your SVR chances mid 70's
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