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315094 tn?1201393650

HR post on exercise?

I keep hearing about an HR post on exhaustive exercise and the effects on the liver.  I can't find it.
I have a problem being reasonable (I do everything in excess). I used to do drugs in excess, now I am into exercise. I'm not sure I'm doing it in excess though. I'm 31 and on tx and still exercise 4 or 5 days a week. I'll stay in the cardio zone (145 to 165bpm) for at least an hour, sometimes an hour and a half per workout. I don't feel like I'm pushing myself, I love it and I'm having fun. Is this exhaustive?
24 Responses
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Nobody can anser the question with certainty, if exhaustive exercise while on tx will lessen your chance of SVR, by causing too much stress that in turn will reduce the efficacy of viral elimination.

It seems wise to keep that stress level within moderation, otherwise too much adrenalin and cortisol will be produced, with potential adverse effects on the antiviral mechanisms meant to be enhanced by tx.
288609 tn?1240100356
It's actually nice to hear that someone is exercising on TX. I am a very active person and will be starting TX probably in JAN., just had my biopsy last Friday. I used to run 6x's a week and was running marathons. I think I might have over stressed my body and lowered its resistance to allow my Hep C to raise it's ugly head. I was worn down and didn't seem to be healing from falls then the stiff joints with RA factor showing up made me decide to TX.
I backed down with the running to 3 x a week and started doing Pilates and Zumba. I like staying strong and in shape because I have a very physical job. I have been very concerned about going into TX because it seems most people have such bad sides that they can hardly walk. So it's nice to hear that some people can still exercise, it's just finding the balance between staying as healthy as possible without  overdoing it. I guess you just have to monitor how your body
responds to it. I would imagine keeping the blood flowing would be good, just knowing when to stop when you have an addictive personality is the tricky part. I would love to hear from others on TX  that can exercise. I've wondered if perhaps the people without so many sides wouldn't be posting to  much because they don't have as much need for support?
Avatar universal
Not directly related to you situation -- but for the first several years after contracting hepc, vigorous and extended exercise did cause several "relapses".

I'm using the word "relapse" in the following sense -- I had a symptomatic acute stage of hep c consisting of the classical sky high enzymes, yellow skin, yellow eyes, white stools, dark urine, EXTREME fatigue, etc.

During 2-5 or so years after my first acute episode, I "relapsed several times back into the acute stage. It was always following a period of vigorous exercise. Then, all of a sudden, that pattern stopped and I could exercise to my hearts content with no "relapse.

Did discuss with one of the leading hepatologists of the day (this was around 30 years ago) and he concurred it was exercise in my case although no real explanation why was given, nor was it probably asked back then. Maybe HR has a theory why I went in and out of what appeared to be an acute stage at least three times in the 2-5 years following exposure.

-- Jim
Avatar universal
To be more specific, first "relapse" was within a month of first acute reaction. Second relapse was around 8 months later. Then I think there was another, but can't remember.
I define a "relapse" as the set of symptons described above occuring after a period of no symptons, including normal enzymes.
Avatar universal
not normal enzymes, but slightly elevated enzymes , as opposed to enzymes over 1000 if I remember correctly.
Avatar universal
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Jim:
it was exercise in my case although no real explanation why was given, nor was it probably asked back then. Maybe HR has a theory why I went in and out of what appeared to be an acute stage at least three times in the 2-5 years following exposure."

It seems wise to keep that stress level within moderation, otherwise too much adrenalin and cortisol will be produced, with potential adverse effects on the antiviral mechanisms that are in place in a chronic HCv hepatitis patient that keep his viral load/replicative activity at a lower level. Temporary supression of immune function will give rise to an increase in the intensity of viral replication and, in the backlash,  the immune response will lead to another  " acute bout".

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