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10325217 tn?1412365301

Hep C question on chance of clearing

Hello... My daughter has just reached the 6 months mark since exposure to Hep C.  She received a confirmed diagnosis that she has it about 4 months ago and had more testing with a gastro Dr. in August.  She lives in Orange County, CA.  I am here with her this week but I live in TN) and have gone to both her appt in August, when I was here, and her appt. yesterday.  

Yesterday was a confusing appt.  Her doctor expressed that her Viral Load Count that was tested 2 months ago is only 24,000 which is very low.  That led me to ask him is this could mean that she is clearing the virus on her own like about 15% of people do.  He expressed that no one ever clears this virus on their own.  I was dumbfounded and asked him again. He said NEVER.  I have read that it does clear for 15% or so of people without treatment.  

Can someone clarify this and also address why the viral load is so low and what this could mean?

THANK YOU...
17 Responses
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1747881 tn?1546175878
If it has 6 months since she was diagnosed, then she is considered chronic and the likely hood she will clear on her own is very slim to none, those that clear on their own do so in the acute phase (1st 6 months), the only thing important about her viral load is that she has one, low or high it doesn't matter

Is it possible for someone to become infected with HCV and then spontaneously clear the infection?

Yes. Approximately 15%–25% of persons clear the virus from their bodies without treatment and do not develop chronic infection; the reasons for this are not well known.

http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/HCV/HCVfaq.htm#c5
Helpful - 0
901131 tn?1293744553
Her Doctor is misinformed. 15-20% of infected people do clear with there own immune system. That would be enough for me to dump the Doc and start looking for a Doc that's a lot more familar with HCV. The viral load means nothing until she starts treatment. It could be 500000 tomorrow. Have they tested her for Genotype yet?
Helpful - 0
10325217 tn?1412365301
She is actually at 6 months now.  The test was run at 4 months.  And I was greatly concerned the doctor had no knowledge of clearing the virus as even a remote possibility.  Should we go to a different doctor?  He seems deficient in knowledge.
Helpful - 0
10325217 tn?1412365301
Thank you for the info.  She has been genotyped.  She is 1 A.  We will locate a new doctor.  I cannot believe this guy didn't know this.  I understand she may not be one who clears it, but, his not knowing that makes it hard to trust his decisions.
Helpful - 0
1747881 tn?1546175878
Yes find a new doc, the info I posted was from the CDC, not hard to find.
Helpful - 0
901131 tn?1293744553
They're are plenty of good Hep doctors in orange county, maybe someone here can point you in the right direction. Also they're about to release new drugs along with the the 2 already available she'll have no problem clearing this virus. Try not to stress she'll be ok.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Just a comment.  My viral load was 357 and I did clear on the new meds.  It is a toss up even with low #s whether clearence will happen on its own.  
As Hrspwr and Boobert stated, she obviously needs a Dr who is more informed.  Your daughter will be OK.
Take Care
.....Kim
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Could that Dr have been tring to tell her that, once she had a genotype and a viral load, there is no way she could clear it on her own?  

still, I totally agree with all, that a second opinion would be a really good step.  

Pat
Helpful - 0
10325217 tn?1412365301
Pat. He was specific in saying no one ever clears Hep C on their own.  

But are you saying that since at 4 months from exposure they geno-typed it and found the virus in her blood (even though viral load was low end) that she will not be one to clear it on her own... ?

Just clarifying and thank YOU EVERYONE for all the input!  
Helpful - 0
1747881 tn?1546175878
One thing to understand, the acute phase is only the first 6 months after exposure, not really after first diagnoses, however if docs are not sure when contracted, they will consider that for the six months. so if the 4 month test was 6 months after exposure then I wouldn't count on her clearing and I would start looking at treatment options, with a good doc of course
Helpful - 0
4670047 tn?1375730401
I live in Orange County. Can you share the doctors name? What type of doctor also.  You can private message me if you want.
My first doctor was not keeping up with my treatment protocol. So I'm just curios.

Kitty
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Marie:  Hrsepwrguy said it right.  I agree with that.  

IF they are SURE they have tested her AFTER The incubation period, then on to treatment.  If not, I would have the new Dr test for viral load and genotype when y'all are sure she is past the 6 month incubation period.  Pat
Helpful - 0
10325217 tn?1412365301
She was exposed specifically in the week of April 1 through April 4.. We do know that for sure. So she is right at 6 months since exposure.  Her genotyping and viral load test was done in Mid August ...So 4 months post exposure, not diagnosis.  So there is still a chance she could have cleared it and we need to test correct...I know it is unlikely... But, she hasn't had a test since 4 months post exposure.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Sounds like a plan -----  but I would still do the tests theough a new Dr -one who really knows and works with hepc treatments and patients.  

Good luck to you both!  

And, if she does test ppositive, then we wish her good luck on her treatment and SVR (sustained viral response = cure) soon.  Pat
Helpful - 0
10325217 tn?1412365301
Thank YOU Pat.  I am being told most insurance is not covering the new treatment... This is likely a new thread... but I am so new to all of this... Any advice there?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
"I am being told most insurance is not covering the new treatment..."

Don't know who told you that. Many on this forum have been treated already with a Sovaldi based treatment - some successfully, some not. There is no reason to think that treatment won't be approved for the new treatments.  However, there is talk online that treatment will be approved for those with the most serious cases of liver disease first.  

Time will tell where all this is going.

I wish your daughter the best in getting treatment as soon as possible.

Nan


Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Nan has told it like it is.  However, since the new meds are going to be 1 pill combos , or maybe 2 pill combo, it will be easier to be compliant, also the treatment (tx) time is mostly only 12 weeks, and I have heard some mention of 8week protocols!   Several on this site, on other threads, have indicated that their Drs are holding off for the mew meds, so those Drs must believe that the meds will be approved.

If not, there is help from the companies, the PAN Foundation, and -- I forget the other foundation, all aimed at getting tx to those who do not have Ins and cannot afford the very high prices.

One thing in favor of this, is for those advanced patients, the most serious cases, the sooner they are cured, the less likely the Ins Companies will have to pay out big bucks forever for transplants and anti-rejection drugs.  That, however is a LONG way in your Daughter's future, even if she does have hepc.

Many if us have had this virus for 40+ years.

Take a deep breath, and relax and take everything one step at a time.  Know that everyone on this site is here to help.

One step at a time.  : -).   Pat

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