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I am Vietnam era vet and I was exposed to hep c from the air gun

they immunized me with the airgun 1973 and tests about 15 yes ago said I had been exposed to hep c but didn't actually have the virus. This went on for 5 yes until they figured out I actually have chroniclymphatic leukemia. They are both blood disorders so I'm wondering if it wasn't the leukemia I was exposed to since the seem related as far as diagnosing them. If they look so much alike to the doctor diagnosing them whats to say they aren't related. All I know is there was a lot dlood on everyone's arm and I was near the end of the line
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683231 tn?1467323017
Not sure if you have a question there. If you have had the HCV RNA by PCR test that looks for the actual virus in your blood and that test is negative you do not have hep c. Having a positive hep c antibody test means you were exposed to hep c at some time in the past but since you do t have any hep c virus that means your body was able to fight off the virus on its own without any help. About 25% of people are able to beat the hep c virus without medical help.

So sorry to hear about your diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. I did a quick search about this chronic disease It does not appear to be a blood borne illness like hep c. It is a form of blood disorder and amount possible causes one that caught my attention is exposure to agent orange.

You might want to check with the VA and see if you can qualify for disability or VA medical benefits.

“ Causes
Doctors aren't certain what starts the process that causes chronic lymphocytic leukemia. What's known is that something happens to cause a genetic mutation in the DNA of blood-producing cells. This mutation causes the blood cells to produce abnormal, ineffective lymphocytes.

Beyond being ineffective, these abnormal lymphocytes continue to live and multiply, when normal lymphocytes would die. The abnormal lymphocytes accumulate in the blood and certain organs, where they cause complications. They may crowd healthy cells out of the bone marrow and interfere with normal blood cell production.

Doctors and researchers are working to understand the exact mechanism that causes chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Risk factors
Factors that may increase the risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia include:

Your age. This disease occurs most often in older adults. On average, people diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia are in their 70s.
Your race. Whites are more likely to develop chronic lymphocytic leukemia than are people of other races.
Family history of blood and bone marrow cancers. A family history of chronic lymphocytic leukemia or other blood and bone marrow cancers may increase your risk.
Exposure to chemicals. Certain herbicides and insecticides, including Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War, have been linked to an increased risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.”

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-lymphocytic-leukemia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352428


From a fellow veteran (76 to 80 and 84 to 88)  thank you for your service.

Best of luck
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1 Comments
I’m working on a database website for veterans to nexus their exposures. Hep c vet buddy link is almost ready to go live. The veteran buddy link database is in process. It won’t be ready for several weeks but it may be helpful to connect or nexus to other vets exposed.
683231 tn?1467323017
Just wanted to add hep c is caused by the hepatitis C virus which is a blood borne virus meaning this invading infection hep c must enter your blood stream. It is an infection like measles for example. Except the hepatitis c virus attacks the liver. Hepa refers to the liver so hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver caused by an invading virus.

Chronic lymphatic leukemia is a type of blood cancer. Basically for some reason the blood cell called lymphocytes begin to form improperly. So yes CLL is a blood disease, a type of blood cancer. While hepatitis C is an infection caused by an invading virus.

Are you seeing a  Hematologist? A hematologist specialized in diseases of the blood.

Hope that helps.
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683231 tn?1467323017
Here is an article about Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
https://www.webmd.com/cancer/lymphoma/chronic-lymphocytic-leukemia-rare
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