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NEGATIVE HCV RNA 8 MONTH AFTER INCEVEK TRIPLE THERAPY

MY QUESTION IS I HAVE BEEN HCV RNA NEGATIVE FOR 8 MONTHS NOW WHAT ARE THE ODDS OF THE VIRUS COMING BACK.MY LIVER ENZIMES ARE NORMAL NOW ALSO ALT 22 AST 24.MY PLATELET COUNT IS THE ONLY THING THATS STILL A LITTLE BIT LOW FROM THE MEDICINE 123 PLATLET COUNT.LET ME KNOW ON THE VIRUS THANK YOU BRIAN DICKENS
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1815939 tn?1377991799
If your HCV RNA is UNDETECTABLE/Negative 8 months after treatment then you have attained what is called sustained viralogical response or SVR. That means you are cured. The virus will not come back. It is gone.

Congratulations on being Hepatitis C free!
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4113881 tn?1415850276
If you have achieved SVR (6 months virus free post treatment) then you will not have a recurrence unless you are to become re-infected.
__________________________________________________________
LONG-TERM CLINICAL, BIOCHEMICAL AND VIROLOGICAL OUTCOMES AFTER SUCCESSFUL HCV-THERAPY
F. Morisco1*, T. Stroffolini2, R. Granata1, L. Donnarumma1, M. Guarino1, N. Caporaso1
1Gastroenterology, University of Naples ' Federico II', Naples, 2Infectious and Tropical Disease, University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy.



Background and aims: In patients with chronic hepatitis C, therapy is considered effective when the sustained virological response (SVR) (undetectable HCV-RNA in serum 6 months after the end of therapy) is achieved. Although the persistence of HCV eradication in short or medium-term period (3-5 years) is well- established, little is known about the long-term follow-up.
The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term persistence of HCV eradication in patients with chronic hepatitis C(CHC) who obtained SVR. In particular, we wanted to assess the risk of long-term virological relapse and liver related-complications.
Methods: From January 1989 to April 2008, 150 consecutive subjects (M/F 100/50, median age 47.69 years, range 22-67) with CHC and SVR after interferon-based therapy, were enrolled in a long-term clinical follow-up study.
137 patients had pre-treatment diagnosis of CHC and 13 patients had cirrhosis.
All patients received interferon-based therapy (66 with conventional IFN-monotherapy, 25 with conventional IFN and ribavirin, and 59 with pegylated IFN and ribavirin). The patients were followed with clinical, biochemical, virological and ultrasonographic assessments every 6 months until the 3th year of follow-up and than every 12 months. HCV-RNA assessment in serum was determined by quantitative RT-PCR ( cut-off < 50 UI/ml).

Results:
The median follow-up was 8,6 years (range:2-19.8 years). Serum HCV-RNA remained undetectable in all patients, indicating no risk of HCV recurrence independently from the schedule of therapy used. During the observation period 3 liver-related complications (2 HCC, 1 bleeding) were observed. The incidence rate of complication was 0.23%/person/year. All 3 of the events occurred in patients with pre-treatment cirrhosis. Only 1 out of 150 patients deceased for liver-related causes (HCC) with a mortality rate of 0.08%/person/year.
Conclusions: In this large cohort of CHC patients with SVR, the eradication of the virus lasted up to 20 years after treatment. Overall, patients with CHC and SVR show an excellent prognosis with no risk of viral recurrence and a very low rate of mortality, so they can be considered healed. Patients with pre-treatment evidence of cirrhosis show a rate of liver complications that cannot be neglected.

http://www1.easl.eu/easl2011/program/Posters/Abstract263.htm
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Avatar universal
no its gone well done go out and enjoy a happy healthy hep free life!
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