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Hi, I was wondering my risk. I tried coke for the first time stupid I know and never again but shared a not with a close firend of mine who also does not use drugs expect for then. We both did a bit and the next morning i noticed blood on one of the bill. Neither of our noses bled except a bit in the morning. Anyways, if someone other than us had used teh bill sometime before us, would this still be a risk?I had the bill in my pocket for at least an hour before we used it maybe more. Do we need to get a test? If so what is the time frame before I can get tested.

I was worried about HIV as well but have been tolf in that forum absolutely no risk
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Avatar universal
Is this not the right forum to ask this kind of stuff? Sorry if it isn't and I apologize.
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Avatar universal
I would say you got the wrong information when you were told that you can't catch HIV through blood transmission.  You absolutely can.  If there was HIV-infected blood on the bill with live virus and you snorted coke and it got into your bloodstream through any kind of opening inside your own nostrils, such as you bled also when you snorted, you CAN get HIV that way.

As for HCV, the virus lives on surfaces a minimum of 16 hours and up to 4 days.  One hour isn't enough to be okay, doesn't matter if the blood dried or not.  That virus is alive and kicking and ready for action.

If you borrowed the bill from someone else who used it for the same thing, more risk still, particularly within those timeframes.  

Now all those scenarios have to exist....infected blood on the bill, snorted and a cut or break of the skin inside your nose...and regardless of how slim..it exists.  It only takes one incident of snorting or IV drug use to pass along the infection.

Yes, get tested.  

I will let someone else answer as to when, or call your doctor, as I'm not sure of the exact windows and timeframes.

Good luck.

Trish

Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Shame on you! How could you be so naive?  I strongly agree with Trish, go and get yourself tested immediately. Half the people I know got HepC this way!  Good Luck to you and yes, you are at the right place. You'll find lots of help here, even if you don't have Hep C, you still have a drug problem, right?
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Avatar universal
Thanks for the feedback, I do agree that I will get tested. as far as HIV i consulted in a infectious disease doc this afternoon and was told it is only a theoretical risk and not to worry he would not test hiv. As far as Hep goes, I will get tested and I hope one mistake in my life wont make me pay. It has only been a week so I have a long wait and cant get tested right away.
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Avatar universal
The odds are with you - however you can tell Dr. "Theoretical risk" that you are asking for a test now and then ask him if he is willing to accept the legal liability that will arise should you test positive some time later and could have had treatment if he hadn't said "no" to the test.  Put stress on the words "legal liability"

He'll test you then.

Get yourself tested 6-9 months or so from now as well.



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Avatar universal
Threatening your doctor with a lawsuit (even an implied threat) should set a really nice tone for the relationship!  That's very bad advice.
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Avatar universal
No need to threaten, that is not nice. Even reading the doctors on the HIV forum say no risk. I guess I will get tested for both at the three month mark to make sure.
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Avatar universal
Hey all, this guide I cam upon that describes the risks very well. It is published by a very conserative group so they would be more likely to pout the fear into someone than not.

http://www.cdnaids.ca/web/repguide.nsf/Pages/45A115EBBCBA2586852570210054FC3E
/$file/HIV%20TRANSMISSION%20Guidelines%20for%20assessing%20risk.pdf

Basically Hep C low risk from sharing snorting gear and HIV negligible with not one confirmed case but could be possible.

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Avatar universal
"I was worried about HIV as well but have been tolf in that forum absolutely no risk"

That's what you posted, I told you that was incorrect.  "absolutely no risk" is incorrect.  

Particularly when you mention the presence of blood for BOTH of you AND on the bill.  Frankly, you put yourself in ALL of the theoretical categories.  You shared equipment, your partner AND you bled and there is blood on the equipment.  That lifts it a little bit higher out of the theoretical and into the possible because, for you, the theoretical has become actual.  It only takes once.  

Please don't be telling people there is "absolutely no risk".  

What makes you think "The Canadian AIDS Society" with links to CATIE is a "conservative" group?

Get tested and good luck.

Trish
Helpful - 0
179856 tn?1333547362
Although I did contract hep this way I'd say your chances of getting it from a bill are much less than the chance you will become a drug addict if you continue - get tested and never do it again!
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Avatar universal
The person I was with and only shared with is a close family member so I am not worried about them and they were just tested a few weeks ago and were negative and has not had any other risks. With HIV the viurs dies very quickly and is not infectious from environmental surfaces especially when the blood dries. I was more worried about someone else's blood on the bill. YOu need to get educated. It is for sure a Hep risk. With not one documented case in the world from snorting does this not put it into a pretty  low group of risks for HIV? If all these people in here who got Hep from snorting and had many IDU's with them you would think there would be at least one case of HIV from snorting would there not?

I will get tested for both at the 3 month mark.

Thanks Nygirl, I did make a mistake for sure and one mistake is enough in this department. I am done and have actually vowed to quit drinking as well as that is when I seem to lose judgment. Have a great day to all.
Helpful - 0
179856 tn?1333547362
Timothy,

"...actually vowed to quit drinking as well as that is when I seem to lose judgment."


You wouldn't be the first one or the last one to say THAT!   Good luck to you.  I mean it - don't waste your life like I did...just NOT worth it.
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Avatar universal
No dispute that it's much more of an HCV risk.  On the HIV risk, I took you up on that and looked into it further.  I stand corrected for the most part AND further educated. I figure the San Francisco AIDS foundation is a pretty reliable source.  This little comment illuminates the amount of time the virus can live - "The CDC reports that drying HIV reduces viral amount by 90-99% within several hours."  So the blood needs to be dried out and it takes some time to kill the bugger, however certainly it dies outside of the body faster than I thought, faster than HCV and the impact of the blood being dry was not something I was aware of.

http://www.sfaf.org/aids101/transmission.html#outside

"In a laboratory, HIV has been kept viable (able to infect) for up to 15 days, and even after the body fluid containing it had dried. However, these experiments involved an extremely high concentration of the virus which was kept at a stable temperature and humidity. These conditions are very unlikely to exist outside of a laboratory. HIV is very fragile, and many common substances, including hot water, soap, bleach and alcohol, will kill it.

The chances of becoming infected with HIV by handling a body fluid are extremely small, because that fluid will rarely have access to a person's bloodstream. However, anyone handling blood, semen or vaginal fluids should be careful to avoid touching them with broken skin or getting them into mucous membranes (such as those around the eye).

Spills of blood should be mopped up, cleaned with soap and water, and then cleaned with bleach. For maximum safety, the person cleaning the spill should also wear latex gloves, and should wash the hands thoroughly after the cleanup.

Air does not "kill" HIV, but exposure to air dries the fluid that contains the virus, and that will destroy or break up much of the virus very quickly. The CDC reports that drying HIV reduces viral amount by 90-99% within several hours.

It should be noted that HIV can survive for several days in the small amount of blood that remains in a needle after use, because the blood is trapped where air cannot dry it out. As a result, used needles are very risky for HIV transmission; they provide a direct path into the bloodstream. Ideally, used needles should never be reused, but if they are, they should always be cleaned with bleach or alcohol before re-use. See the section on Injection Drug Risk Reduction for additional information on this subject."

Good luck to you, Timothy.

Trish

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Avatar universal
Thanks for the good lucks and wishes Trish I hope it all works out.
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Avatar universal
"No need to threaten, that is not nice."

No it is not nice.  You are very right.
You know what's even less nice?
The fact that most doctors that you see, especially the ones working in HMO type facilities, are not working for you, they are working for the HMO.

And the HMO doesn't care about you at all.  They care about cost control.

So would a doctor forgo an HIV test just to keep his monthly costs down (which HMO's track) ?  You bet he would - his job is literally on the line.  See the Michael Moore movie "Sicko" - regardless of what you think of his politics, the movie is an eye-opener.

So it is not surprising when you ask if the Doctor is sure is he wants to accept the legal liability  for NOT ordering a test, that the decision will often be reversed.

It's just a thought.
Many of us have great relationships with our Doctors out there and there are many great and caring Doctors out there.  But there are a while lot of them just in it for the money.  How many of us had related stories here about Doctors not ordering HVC tests even though their ALT/AST levels had been elevated for years?  

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Avatar universal
"6-9 months for HIV test is incorrect. Get tested after 3 months and be done with that. "

FYI:
http://www.avert.org/hivtesting.htm#q3

"So it is best to wait for at least 3 months after the last time you were at risk before taking the test. Some test centres may recommend testing again at 6 months, just to be extra sure, though in most cases this is not necessary."

http://www.hivtest.org/faq.cfm#exposure

"repeat testing should be considered >3 months after the exposure occurred to account for the possibility of a false-negative result. Ninety seven percent will develop antibodies in the first 3 months following the time of their infection. In very rare cases, it can take up to 6 months to develop antibodies to HIV."

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