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ginkobioloba extract

Do (Ginkgobiloba extract, ginger  and Gouta kola) have side effect on hepatic patient
what is the recommended multivit. to be used
5 Responses
476246 tn?1418874514
I have read that Ginkobiloba and Gotu Kola are contraindicated to people with any kind of liver disease. I'll try to find the link to it.

Marcia
476246 tn?1418874514
This is some important info I found on Ginkgo Biloba on     umm.edu/altmed/

Marcia

Precautions

The use of herbs is a time-honored approach to strengthening the body and treating disease. Herbs, however, contain components that can trigger side effects and interact with other herbs, supplements, or medications. For these reasons, herbs should be taken with care, under the supervision of a health care provider qualified in the field of botanical medicine.

GBE is considered to be safe, and side effects are rare. In a few cases, gastrointestinal upset, headaches, skin reactions, and dizziness were reported.

Because gingko decreases platelet aggregation (stickiness), there is some concern that it may increase risk of intracranial (brain) hemorrhage. In fact, there have been several reports of bleeding complications associated with ginkgo use. However, it is not clear whether ginkgo or another factor (such as the combination of ginkgo and blood-thinning medications including aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents such as ibuprofen) caused the bleeding complications. One human study found that a ginkgo extract significantly prolonged bleeding time when given along with cilostazol (Pletal), a commonly used medication that inhibits platelet aggregation.

Pregnant and breastfeeding women should avoid using ginkgo preparations. In addition, ginkgo use should be discontinued at least 36 hours prior to surgery due to the risk of bleeding complications.

Do not ingest Ginkgo biloba fruit or seed.

Possible Interactions

Ginkgo may alter the metabolism and effectiveness of some prescription and non-prescription medications. If you are being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use ginkgo without first talking to your health care provider:

Anticonvulsant medications -- High doses of ginkgo could decrease the effectiveness of anticonvulsant therapy, such as carbamazepine (Tegretol) or valproic acid (Depakote), in controlling seizures.

Antidepressant medications -- Taking ginkgo along with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) antidepressants -- including fluoxetin (Prozac), sertraline (Zoloft), paroxetine (Paxil), and escitalopram (Lexapro) -- may cause serotonin syndrome. This condition is characterized by rigidity, tachycardia (fast heart rate), hyperthermia (high body temperature), restlessness, and diaphoresis (sweating). Ginkgo may enhance the effects (both good and bad) of antidepressant medications known as MAOIs, such as phenelzine (Nardil).

Antihypertensive medications -- Ginkgo may decrease blood pressure, so use of ginkgo along with prescription antihypertensive medications should be monitored by a health care provider. There has been a report of an interaction between ginkgo and nifedipine (Procardia), a calcium channel blocking drug used for blood pressure and arrhythmias.

Blood-thinning medications -- Ginkgo has blood-thinning properties and therefore should not be used if you are taking anticoagulant (blood-thinning) medications, such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dipyridamole (Persantine), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), or warfarin (Coumadin). There has been bleeding in the brain reported when using a ginkgo product and ibuprofen (Advil), a non-steroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID).

Blood sugar lowering medications -- Ginkgo was reported to increase insulin levels in healthy subjects and to decrease insulin levels in diabetic patients. Use ginkgo supplements under the supervision of a health care provider if you are diabetic and taking insulin or oral blood sugar lowering drugs.

Cylosporine -- Ginkgo biloba may help protect the cells of the body during treatment with the immunosuppressive (decreases immunity) drug cyclosporine.

Thiazide diuretics -- Although there has been one literature report of increased blood pressure associated with the use of ginkgo during treatment with thiazide diuretics, this interaction has not been verified by clinical trials. Nevertheless, you should consult with your health care provider before using ginkgo if you are taking thiazide diuretics.

Trazodone -- There has been a report of an adverse interaction between ginkgo and trazodone (Desyrel), an antidepressant medication that resulted in an elderly patient going into a coma.
476246 tn?1418874514
And this on Gotu Kola

Precautions

The use of gotu kola for more than 6 weeks is not recommended. People taking the herb for an extended period of time (up to 6 weeks) should take a 2-week break before taking the herb again.

Asiaticoside, a major component of gotu kola, has also been associated with tumor growth in mice. Though more studies are needed, it is wise for anyone with a history of precancerous or cancerous skin lesions -- such as squamous cell, basal cell skin cancer, or melanoma -- to refrain from taking this herb.

Side Effects

Side effects are rare but may include skin allergy and burning sensations (with external use), headache, stomach upset, nausea, dizziness, and extreme drowsiness. These side effects tend to occur with high doses of gotu kola.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Pregnant women should not take gotu kola because it may cause spontaneous abortion. There is little or no information regarding the safety of this herb during breastfeeding, so nursing mothers should refrain from taking this herb.

Pediatric Use

Gotu kola is not recommended for children.

Geriatric Use

People older than 65 years should take gotu kola at a lower than standard dose. The strength of the dosage can be increased slowly over time to reduce symptoms. This is best accomplished under the guidance of an appropriately trained and certified herbalist such as a naturopathic doctor.

Interactions and Depletions

There have been no reports documenting negative interactions between gotu kola and medications to date. Since high doses of gotu kola can cause sedation, individuals should refrain from taking this herb with medications that promote sleep or reduce anxiety.
476246 tn?1418874514
I think that my first statement was incorrect. I must have read that it is not good to take these while on treatment, because of herb and drug interaction and the other factors mentioned. I do NOT know, if they are actually act in favor to or can harm the liver.

Marcia
Avatar universal
Wanted to know cual serious the danger to consume the sabila by mas of a week, if this generates deficiencias in the atencion, the vision, the potencia sexual
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