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hep c - Immune system

I just had some reacuring hpv growths removed from my throat, this is the second time, I was  told if they continue to be recurrent that interferon is one of the treatments, I have 2 questions, has anyone else had this problem to go along with their hep c ? and would the current treatment for the hep c kill 2 birds with one stone, the hpv lesions and hep c? I have also had a lot of other problems, diabettis, continuing gum problems, numb foot, (can't spell peripherl neuropathy..lol) reacuring colon polyps, do you think the stress of 35 years of the hep compromises the immune system, or just coincidence, I was stage 2 grade 2, with vl-load 13 million 2 years ago, in your opinion's should I treat now or wait until the new drug teleplivar is available, (which just seems to be getting farther in the future) I know you are all going to tell me to talk to my doctor, but they all seem to have different answers, the E.N.T. say they are unrelated, my P.M.C. doc seems to think like me there could be something to the weakend immune system theory, my liver doc just thinks the decision is mine, some other opinions would be greatly appreciated, Thanks
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92903 tn?1309904711
I don't know which scene I like better - him eating the eggs, or the girl washing the car. Gotta be the girl washing the car, I s'pose.

A quick Goog search shows that interferon is used treat HPV by injecting at the site of the wart. I suppose it would make sense to have those injections done while on hep treatment, perhaps subtracting the dose from what would otherwise be adminstered for the hep. I'm guessing you would self inject those.

I doubt anyone here has dealt with this particular issue - not meaning genital warts in the back of the throat - I'm sure that's common enough - but treating them concurrently with hep C treatment is probably rather rare.
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568322 tn?1370165440
"I suppose it would make sense to have those injections done while on hep treatment"
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I have heard hepatologits say that infections should be dealt with BEFORE starting Hep C treatment because having active infections (like CMV, herpes, etc) can lower SVR.  So if you have let's say Herpes, taking an antiviral like Acyclovir to keep the herpes in remission while you treat for Hep C can help increase your chances of SVR.

Co
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568322 tn?1370165440

"would the current treatment for the hep c kill 2 birds with one stone, the hpv lesions and hep c?"
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Studies have shown that Interferon injected directly into the lesions does not cure the disease, it doesn't reduce the rate of recurrence and it eliminated the lesions in only  half of the patients.

Perhaps taking interferon systemically would keep you from getting an hpv  recurrence while you're taking the interferon.  But hpv can return months later because the virus lies dormant in skin cells.


"I have also had a lot of other problems, diabettis, continuing gum problems, numb foot, (can't spell peripherl neuropathy..lol) reacuring colon polyps, do you think the stress of 35 years of the hep compromises the immune system, or just coincidence"
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The hepatitis c virus causes diabetes....and diabetes causes gum problems and peripheral neuropathy.  My guess is that your blood sugar may not be under good control.    

Interestingly, recent studies have shown that Metformin, a drug used for diabetes boosts the immune system.  So if you have to take medication for diabetes, you may want to ask your doctor about using Metformin.

Here's an article about Metformin helping the immune system.....

Co



Metformin may improve immune response and cancer treatments

June 7, 2009

McGill.ca - Researchers at McGill University and the University of Pennsylvania have discovered that a widely used anti-diabetic drug - metformin (Glucophage®) - can boost the immune system and increase the potency of vaccines and cancer treatments. Their findings are to be published June 3, 2009 in the journal Nature.

The discovery was made by Dr. Russell Jones, of McGill’s Goodman Cancer Centre, Yongwon Choi, PhD, and postdoctoral fellow Erika Pearce, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania. They discovered that the widely prescribed diabetes treatment metformin increases the efficiency of the immune system’s T-cells, which in turn makes cancer and virus-fighting vaccines more effective.

The specialized white blood cells of the human immune system known as “T-cells” remember pathogens they have encountered from previous infections or vaccinations, enabling them to fight subsequent infections much faster. This “immunological memory” has been the subject of intense study for many years, but until now the underlying cellular mechanisms behind it were not well understood. Now, the researchers say, they can use diabetic therapies to manipulate T-cell response and enhance the immune system’s response to infections and cancer alike.

“Many genes involved in diabetes regulation also play a role in cancer progression,” Jones explained. “There is also a significant body of data suggesting that diabetics are more prone to certain cancers. However, our study is the first to suggest that by targeting the same metabolic pathways that play a role in diabetes, you can alter how well your immune system functions.”

“We serendipitously discovered that the metabolizing, or burning, of fatty acids by T-cells following the peak of infection is critical to establishing immunological memory,” Pearce added. “We used metformin, which is known to operate on fatty-acid metabolism, to enhance this process, and have shown experimentally in mice that metformin increases T-cell memory as well as the ensuing protective immunity of an experimental anti-cancer vaccine.”

Recent advances have uncovered common links between cancer and diabetes, in particular how metabolic pathways, the basic chemical reactions that happen in our cells, are controlled in these diseases. The recent findings suggest a new link between the metabolic pathways deregulated in cancer and diabetes and their role in immune cell function. The results suggest that common diabetic therapies which alter cellular metabolism may enhance T-cell memory, providing a boost to the immune system. This could lead to novel strategies for vaccine and anti-cancer therapies.

“Our findings were unanticipated, but are potentially extremely important and could revolutionize current strategies for both therapeutic and protective vaccines,” Choi said.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/152671.php
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